Frivolous theorem of arithmetic on Wikipedia

  1. [SOLVED] Frivolous theorem of arithmetic on Wikipedia

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frivolous_Theorem_of_Arithmetic

    There's a debate on whether we should delete this theorem from Wikipedia because some consider it "useless". Should it be deleted?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Hurkyl

    Hurkyl 16,090
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    How does one vote? Just edit the vote for deletion page?
     
  4. dextercioby

    dextercioby 12,304
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

  5. dextercioby

    dextercioby 12,304
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    I think it should be put under a joke-section...

    Daniel.
     
  6. But that would raise the question on the "usefulness" of theorems. The way I see it is: if it's true, then it has to be said, no matter how trivial.
     
  7. dextercioby

    dextercioby 12,304
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Nope,it is a joke...As for "usefulness" of theorems,i don't see the connections...

    Daniel.
     
  8. The entry on wikipedia is being deleted under the pretense that it is not "useful". But then, there are some theorems that are not "useful" which aren't being deleted.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 9, 2005
  9. dextercioby

    dextercioby 12,304
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    "Useful" is a subjective term.Mathematics is the last place on Earth where u could have subjectivity...

    So let's drop it...

    Daniel.
     
  10. Which is precisely why the entry should not be deleted under that pretense. But if you feel this way, you can go vote for deletion.
     
  11. Hurkyl

    Hurkyl 16,090
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Surely you've encountered facts in science that was entirely useless, except that it improved your perspective on things?
     
  12. Zurtex

    Zurtex 1,123
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Philistines!

    Some people just don't understand the point of mathematics.
     
  13. shmoe

    shmoe 1,994
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    I would not call it useless but a humerous reminder of the limitations of finite computations. It happens often enough, piles upon piles of numerical data suggest a function behaves a certain way then it's shown that it does exactly what we expect it not to do outside the range of our fancy computers (e.g. Mertens conjecture).
     
  14. :rofl: That is the most weak theorem ever, i mean cmon the definitions used are so empty. I bet it isn't a mathematician who suggested that theorem.
    ( Maybe a physicist, they like to play with "large numbers" :tongue2: )
     
  15. Ah, but it's a theorem nevertheless!
     
  16. Perhaps wikipedia needs pages describing theorems that tell us that 1+1=2, 1+2=3, 1+3=4, and so on.
     
  17. yea, it is all about quantity in this world today, who cares about quality!
     
  18. Zurtex

    Zurtex 1,123
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    And does MathWorld?

    http://mathworld.wolfram.com/FrivolousTheoremofArithmetic.html

    Oh and please do prove for me rigoursly that 1+1=2, but that's an equation not really a theorem.

    You could describe every single number a physicist has ever used as small (I probabily would because I do a lot of cryptography) and still we know that most numbers are large, we have a nice theorem saying so :approve:

    What has that got to do with this at all?
     
  19. arildno

    arildno 12,015
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    Perhaps Wikipedia needs a section of "The most false theorems" as well:
    Here's mine:
    The primes are closed under multiplication..
     
  20. dextercioby

    dextercioby 12,304
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Zurtex,[itex] 1+1=2 [/itex] is an equality,not an equation...


    Daniel.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share a link to this question via email, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Similar discussions for: Frivolous theorem of arithmetic on Wikipedia
Loading...