Frog Survival Freezing

Main Question or Discussion Point

Have they identified the genes behind frogs being able to produce antifreeze and surviving freezing themselves that way? Can anyone shed more light on frogs freezing themselves? thanks
 

Answers and Replies

Danger
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I don't know about frogs, but they've been transplanting the fish anti-freeze gene into plants like tomatoes for a few years now.
 
Could you give me a link or anything to that?
 
Danger
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I hadn't paid any attention since the first experiments were performed; apparently they failed.
http://www.geo-pie.cornell.edu/media/fishberries.html [Broken]
 
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I understand that frogs still age when they are in suspended animation...

if you're not breathing though, aren't you not acquiring oxidative DNA damage? is a frog not getting oxidative DNA damage while in suspended animation? why or why not?
 
What are the ways to acquire oxidative DNA damage while not breathing?
 
Danger
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Someone else will have to field this; I really don't know anything about it.
 
frogs breathe through their skin when they're in suspended animation...I kind of thought they just stopped completely...

Can you cryogenically freeze something with antifreeze to protect damage to cells or would that not work?
 
also if neurons were not in the right place, what are the possible problems that would cause? (In a scenario where the brain would not be aging) thanks (Ignore all previous questions I got those answered...ty)
 
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I've heard that the longest time an animal could freeze itself for like a frog was 9 months, I think that was an insect I'm not sure if that's true, it's just something I read

Would it be possible to make a mammal be able to freeze itself like a frog/an animal that can put itself into a state where it doesn't breathe/have a heartbeat by genetically engineering it- I mean, if they haven't done it yet, does that mean it's not possible with our current knowledge? ty, this is my only question relating to frogs
 
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We had a similar discussion two months ago - https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=240884".

The highlights of that discussion:

1.) The frogs aren't *frozen* frozen (their cells are full of cryoprotectant and are a few degrees below freezing, not really cold cryogenic conditions like being dipped in liquid nitrogen), they're at a low enough temperature to essentially slow down all metabolism/physiological function to a point where the frog can survive on the nutrients stuffed into the cell at the point of "freezing" for some time.

2.) No real idea as to the question of brain function, one would need to observe the frog for an entire hibernation period so as to see if there are any very low-frequency neural behaviors during that period. No one has done that, and it's impossible to say without such experiments. So please don't ask me about it, I have no clue. :)

In the link provided in the earlier discussion, the scientist interviewed addressed the possibility of freezing humans. It's too early to say anything definitively. Perhaps in a century (or perhaps sooner, or later, it's impossible to predict) we will be able to handle cryoprotectant delivery and extraction for an entire human body and know how to simultaneously freeze all organ systems. But right now, your guess is as good as mine.
 
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But, right now, could we make a mammal be able to have the ability that frogs do (below) I think other insects/other things may have it as well, through genetic engineering or do we not know enough? I mean could we eventually do it through trial and error or something or do we just not know enough right now?

1.) The frogs aren't *frozen* frozen (their cells are full of cryoprotectant and are a few degrees below freezing, not really cold cryogenic conditions like being dipped in liquid nitrogen), they're at a low enough temperature to essentially slow down all metabolism/physiological function to a point where the frog can survive on the nutrients stuffed into the cell at the point of "freezing" for some time.
 
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In the link provided in the earlier discussion, the scientist interviewed addressed the possibility of freezing humans. It's too early to say anything definitively. Perhaps in a century (or perhaps sooner, or later, it's impossible to predict) we will be able to handle cryoprotectant delivery and extraction for an entire human body and know how to simultaneously freeze all organ systems. But right now, your guess is as good as mine.
Replace "human" with "mammal" in this paragraph and my answer is still the same. Your guess is as good as mine. More research is needed.

Also, remember that frogs are cold-blooded (ectotherms, technically), mammals are warm-blooded. One needs to account for that factor. How, precisely, I'm not sure - never took animal physiology, sorry. Someone else will need to come in for that discussion.
 

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