Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Fun math problem I made up

  1. Aug 22, 2010 #1

    i2c

    User Avatar

    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 22, 2010 #2

    CRGreathouse

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Is [tex]\varphi[/tex] constant with respect to x?

    What branch of the complex logarithm are we supposed to use?
     
  4. Aug 22, 2010 #3

    i2c

    User Avatar

    Yes Phi is just a constant. What branch of the complex logarithm? Um, I don't know what that means, (I'm only going to be in AP Calculus next year :)) But I can hint to you that e^(i*pi) = -1 rearranged with a ln will give you what I'm looking for. (I think a scientific calculator *should* do that part? Maybe?) Oh and by the way, I kind of messed up, what I'm saying is that's the function, and take the fifth derivative of it, so i know it's not the correct notation but I screwed up.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2010
  5. Aug 23, 2010 #4
    would you mind explaining where the integral comes from and what is that awkward symbol, that sort of looks like the Summation Sign (Sigma)? Moreover, what is f? In general, I can't make any sense of what's going on
     
  6. Aug 23, 2010 #5
    I'm lost, also. I'm not sure what's going on in this problem and the symbolism used is very perplexing...
     
  7. Aug 23, 2010 #6

    i2c

    User Avatar

    It's supposed to be perplexing. It's a sigma, on top, instead of being a number like 32 or infinity, it's a number but you have to solve the limit to find the number. The middle equation is just finding the fifth derivative of the equation. (Very easy it's just a polynomial) and then the bottom term (in a sigma it would normally be x = 8 or something) is just x = something but you have to solve the integral first to get that number. And I don't really know how I got that integral I just was messing around on my TI89. But I can assure that the top and bottom constraints work. And the notation is supposed to be confusing, if I wrote, sigma(2x-3, x, x=5, 26) that would be no fun now would it?
     
  8. Aug 23, 2010 #7
    Okay, so what you're saying is that the [tex]\int^{ln\sqrt{-1}}_{e^{i\Pi}} 2sin(x)cos(x)dx[/tex] is the lower bound of the giant sigma? the upper bound is limit portion of the problem?
     
  9. Aug 23, 2010 #8
    The level of difficulty of a problem does has nothing to do with how confusing the notation is. It seems like you went out of your way to make this problem as confusing as possible.. its not only confusing, but it has several errors. A genuinely difficult math problem will be difficult regardless. You should practice writing a problem as straightforward as possible.
     
  10. Aug 23, 2010 #9

    i2c

    User Avatar



    Yes, except it's ln(sqrt(i root(-1)))

    Yes I did, and sorry about the errors I don't *really* know what I'm doing. :)
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Fun math problem I made up
  1. Fun math proof (Replies: 18)

  2. To make maths fun (Replies: 5)

Loading...