Function:when you set x equal to something, you use brackets, right? (example inside)

  • #1
Femme_physics
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I was always sure you use brackets but lately a certainly question had shaken my confidence. Can you confirm one uses brackets when settings the x equal to something in a function f(x).
 

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  • #2
tiny-tim
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Hi Femme_physics! :smile:

(wouldn't it have been quicker to type it rather than attach a picture? :confused:)

If f(x) = -x2 + 4

then f(-10) = -(-10)2 + 4.

I don't know what --102 + 4 would mean, but I suspect it would be --(102) + 4 = (102) + 4 :confused:
 
  • #3
Femme_physics
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Tiny-tim! Good to see you! Where've you been hiding? ^^ :)

Hi Femme_physics! :smile:

(wouldn't it have been quicker to type it rather than attach a picture? :confused:)
LMAO! Force of habit!

If f(x) = -x2 + 4

then f(-10) = -(-10)2 + 4.

I don't know what --102 + 4 would mean, but I suspect it would be --(102) + 4 = (102) + 4 :confused:
Heh, yes. So it's settled, you use brackets.
 
  • #4
tiny-tim
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Tiny-tim! Good to see you! Where've you been hiding? ^^ :)
finding nemo! :rolleyes:

where were you? :biggrin:
 
  • #5
Femme_physics
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Hehe. You know I'm always here, distraught about some new statics problem. My lovely guardian angel these days is I like Serena :) But you're also always welcome to flop those golden fins, sending me ripples of comprehension in my quest to understand mechanics^^
 
  • #6
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I don't know what --102 + 4 would mean, but I suspect it would be --(102) + 4 = (102) + 4
Clearly, --102 + 4 means 92 + 4 = 85.:biggrin:

Similarly, ++102 + 4 would be 112 + 4 = 125


BTW, some of us on the west side of the Atlantic call these things - [] - brackets, these things - {} - braces, these things - <> - angle brackets, and these things - () - parentheses. I understand that the terminology is somewhat different in GB.
 
  • #7
Char. Limit
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these things - <> - angle brackets
Oh, is that what they're called? I just call them arrow thingies.
 
  • #8
Femme_physics
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Oh, is that what they're called? I just call them arrow thingies.
Aherm, vector notation on the Cartesian plane. Check yourself before you wreck yourself ;)
 
  • #9
Char. Limit
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To be fair, I also call brackets "square thingies" and paretheses "round thingies".
 
  • #10
Femme_physics
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To be fair, I also call brackets "square thingies" and paretheses "round thingies".
LOL. I actually knew you were joking, Char, I just wanted to jokingly patronize over you and sound smart for a milisecond :D
 
  • #11
Char. Limit
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LOL. I actually knew you were joking, Char, I just wanted to jokingly patronize over you and sound smart for a milisecond :D
Huh? I'm not joking. That's actually what I call them.
 
  • #12
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|| - straight thingies?
& - curly thingy?
~ - wavy thingy?
 
  • #13
Char. Limit
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See, Mark gets me! Oh, and these: {} are pointy thingies.
 

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