Future Career

  • Thread starter TwigLaser
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  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

Hello everyone I'm currently new here and was hoping to find some guidance to my scientific career. I'm 14 years old, I was born in 25/05/1995(mm/dd/yy). My favorite sport is Hockey. My favorite team is...Pittsburgh penguins. My favorite player is Sidney Crosby. I like chemistry, I always work independently, and I'm a fast learner. I can also work in isolated places and disturbing places( like a room filled with lots of yelling kids). I also have a natural skill in mathematics and science. Although I got some problems with my language marks(English is my second language)

Now that you know me better, here's my question: If your going to become a scientist who likes chemistry, how do you start? What's the system of becoming one? Is it hard? What do you need to have a great science career(what kind of languages, skills, etc.)? I was thinking about it but didn't come to an answer so I decided to look on Google and happily found this forum.

Oh I forgot to mention my name, it's Houssein.
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
If your going to become a scientist who likes chemistry, how do you start? What's the system of becoming one? Is it hard? What do you need to have a great science career(what kind of languages, skills, etc.)?
Firstly, welcome to the forums, TwigLaser! I hope you are happy here, and that we can help you with any questions you may have for many years to come.

How you start: hard work! Work away and keep up the grades in school, in all of your subjects. This makes sure that you have the biggest range of options when the time comes to make a decision about your career. To work in science, you probably already know that you will likely need to go to college/university. You will spend a few years there, working in the lab and going to classes, learning as much as you can - and when you finish, you can choose to keep on studying to get more qualifications or try and find yourself a job!

Is it hard? It can be. You won't find anyone that will tell you it's easy, if I can put it that way :smile: You're young now, if you put your mind to it and stick to your goals then you'll give yourself a good chance.

And what do you need to have a good career? Keeping with the theme I've introduced before, hard work! Have a passion for what you do. If you enjoy chemistry, great, you're already taking on half the battle. Enjoying it every day when you go to work is very important, but it is also important to work away at the things you don't enjoy so much - you never know when they will become useful.
 
  • #3
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Wow, your words really opened my mind a bit. But when you have a weakness in subjects like french and language, what should you do? I mean, do you really need them? I understand why I need ''language''. In fact im nether excellent nor poor at it , im right in the middle. but its french that's nagging me. I don't know if I'm ready for a third language. So is french really necessary? I even heard that Latin and German is really helpful when it comes to science(for some reason).


Anyway, thanks for the advice. It really inspired me to work harder.
 
  • #4
lisab
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Wow, your words really opened my mind a bit. But when you have a weakness in subjects like french and language, what should you do? I mean, do you really need them? I understand why I need ''language''. In fact im nether excellent nor poor at it , im right in the middle. but its french that's nagging me. I don't know if I'm ready for a third language. So is french really necessary? I even heard that Latin and German is really helpful when it comes to science(for some reason).


Anyway, thanks for the advice. It really inspired me to work harder.
Hi TwigLaser and welcome from me, too :smile:.

Many universities require a language taken in high school, usually two years. More and more in science, English is the primary language used, though. German used to be used a lot in chemistry, but not as much now.
 
  • #6
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universities require a language taken in high school.
So if I learned German from the internet or from some person willing to teach me- it wouldn't count because I didn't take it in high school?
 
  • #7
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So if I learned German from the internet or from some person willing to teach me- it wouldn't count because I didn't take it in high school?
Well, you can learn it by yourself and take the German SAT Subject test. I don't know how colleges consider subject tests in place of credit.
 
  • #8
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Well, I'm too young to think about this anyway o_O. Il try my best with french in till im in high school.( IM in grade 8 at the moment)
 
  • #9
lisab
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
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Well, I'm too young to think about this anyway o_O. Il try my best with french in till im in high school.( IM in grade 8 at the moment)
Ah, I thought you were in high school. Well you should check with your advisor to be sure, but I believe language classes taken in middle school count towards the university requirement. So you may not have to take German in high school, unless you want to. Again, check with your advisor.

Since your interest is in chemistry, be sure to give those classes a lot of attention, and also your math classes. Good luck!
 
  • #10
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Thanx, I heard that i'm getting 100% on my math for my report card. Im not sure but im expecting a really high mark. Expecting the same for science, but more in the 80's.
 
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  • #11
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dude...i just graduated and got straight 90's on my math marks. 92 for my science mark. 1 of my math marks were 99%!! hurray!

I also got the science, math, and academic improvement awards.
 
  • #12
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Congratulations dude.
 
  • #13
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Thank you.
 

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