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Courses Future Physics Courses

  1. Mar 17, 2012 #1
    Hello everyone. My name is Artemis (namesake of Greek goddess/hunter yet I am male) and I am seeking advice on my future academic study. I am currently 12 years old, and though that is a subtle age I am currently taking private courses in Quantum Physics. My course is about to be completed and was wondering about what my next course, involving Physics, should be. I am familiar with many concepts and was thinking of pursuing a course in nuclear physics. Thanks in advance for your guidance.
    Regards, Artemis.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 17, 2012 #2
    What does your mathematical background look like?
     
  4. Mar 17, 2012 #3
    Well, first of all thank-you was replying so suddenly. Secondly, as I said I am only 12 years old, so in terms of my mathematical "background" I seem to be pretty skilled in it. I am familiar with Calculus I/II and everything before it such as trigonometry.
     
  5. Mar 17, 2012 #4

    jtbell

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    Staff: Mentor

    Which physics textbook are you using now, and which ones have you used in the past? That would help us understand the level that you are at now.
     
  6. Mar 17, 2012 #5
    Good thing I kept an online MySQL database of my textbooks.
    The Character of Physical Law
    The Feynman lectures on Physics
    Theoretical concepts in physics
    E-Z Physics
    Classical Mechanics
    QED: The strange theory of light and matter
    Introductory Quantum Mechanics

    Unfortunately later I became lazy and didn't record the rest.
     
  7. Mar 17, 2012 #6
    There are many books called Classical Mechanics and Introductory Quantum Mechanics. Who are the authors? And which of those books did you work through fully?
     
  8. Mar 17, 2012 #7

    jtbell

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    Staff: Mentor

    ^^

    In general, people talk about textbooks in terms of authors, not titles. I couldn't tell you to save my life, without looking it up, the name of the textbook that we've used here for the last 4 or 5 years in our intro physics course for non-majors, and I bet not very many other professors could do it with their textbooks, either. But when I say "Serway and Vuille," my colleagues know which one I'm talking about. Same for upper-level books.
     
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