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Fx= -du/dx does the e2=-du

  1. Nov 20, 2009 #1
    im unsure about if two equations are mathematically similar whether they equal the same. ill give an example

    Fx=e2/ 4[tex]\pi[/tex][tex]\epsilon[/tex]0x2

    is similar to Fx= -du/dx does the e2=-du

    ?

    btw the pi and E are not raised to the power its just my inability to use latex =]
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 20, 2009 #2

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Re: Equations

    This looks like the force between two point charges.

    No. Why do you think these equations are mathematically similar?

    That's because you're mixing latex and non-latex within an equation. Write the equation using only latex.
     
  4. Nov 20, 2009 #3
    Re: Equations

    when calculating the distance between atoms in a structure. in the lecture we used sodium chloride an the force acting on the to calculate the potential energy and therefore the energy used to break the bonds. so we intergrated the force between two points equation and calculated the potential energy
    this is why im getting confused
     
  5. Nov 20, 2009 #4

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Re: Equations

    Given the force, F(x), you can find the potential energy using F = -dU/dx. Thus:
    U = - ∫F(x) dx
     
  6. Nov 20, 2009 #5
    Re: Equations

    ok i see. makes sense
    thanks for clearing that up
    cheers
     
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