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Gambling/Stocks/Books/Cars/Whatever

  1. Oct 8, 2004 #1
    What is gambling compared to the stock market or selling something which has value less than the sum of it's expense? All profit beyond your expenditure is the same. Do you understand? There is no good, no bad on the balance. I herd a song on the radio the other day, it was a childrens song from the lion king, "Circle of life" listen to it.

    The reason you do what you all do what we all do is because not that you don't believe in God, but because you don't believe in physics. You already believe in God. Hahahahahahahahahahahahahaha. I know you better than you know yourselves.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 8, 2004 #2

    russ_watters

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    Stock trading certanly is a gamble. So is insurance. Think about it: with your car insurance, you're betting a hundred bucks a month that you will have a car accident. So if you want to win your bet, just drive your car into a tree!
     
  4. Oct 8, 2004 #3

    Monique

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    lol, that's a good way to put it :tongue2:
     
  5. Oct 8, 2004 #4

    Evo

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    Huge difference, in gambling you are depending mostly on a random occurence (roll of the dice, getting certain cards, etc...) When you invest in the stock market, unless you are an idiot, you do a lot of research into the company you plan to invest in, you don't invest unless you see potential for increased profit. The decision is knowledge driven.

    Sometimes you would rather have some money as opposed to none and be willing to sell something at a loss.

    So what's your point?

    Utter nonsense.
     
  6. Oct 8, 2004 #5
    As humans we look to gain, maybe as animals maybe not. If I gain in the stock market, someone must lose. If I gain by selling a book, someone must also lose. If I gain by selling my car someone must also lose. Do you not understand? In order to gain, beyond the value of your expended energy you must take from someone or something else. This is what causes the worlds pain, this is what causes the worlds imbalance. If any of you do not understand, life will one day make you understand. I hope that day comes a little at a time and not all at once for you. In the direction we head it is much like the bay of fundy.
     
  7. Oct 8, 2004 #6

    shmoe

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    I disagree with this. If I have a book that I never intend to read again, I will gain if I sell it cheaply (or give it away-this is a gain in shelf space). The person recieving the book will presumably value the book at least as much as the money (if any) exchanged, so they gain too. There are exchanges where both parties win.
     
  8. Oct 8, 2004 #7
    This is not the type of exhange of which I mean and if you think of my words you may understand their context. To find life in that which was used and find other life for it is good. For all things have a value beyond our ideas. When we realize this life begins to have balance, responsiblility happens, a circle is born. Only in this frame of mind will humanity be able to continue.
     
  9. Oct 8, 2004 #8

    Evo

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    Not necessarily. I go into the bookstore to buy a specific book. While I am there I see your book and decide to buy it also. Who lost? I bought the book I went there for, so the author gained, so did the publisher, I also bought your book, you gained, so did the publisher, the bookstore gained even more because I bought two books instead of one. I gained because I now have two books I am interested in.

    Wrong again. This can be a win for everyone. The person that buys your car might have a particular reason for buying that particular car and otherwise not bought a car. So, no one lost an opportunity to sell him a car. No one else wanted your car, so no one lost the opportunity to buy it.

    Wrong, this isn't necessarily true, there can be gains without a negative impact on anything else. Things aren't as cut and dried as you make them out to be.

    Since your example could not prove the effect you mentioned, I don't see the validity in your statement.

    You're always so depressed, try to look at the positive side of things once in a while.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2004
  10. Oct 8, 2004 #9
    The song of the drummer boy, until you live it you will not understand myself or the truth neither are a requirements for life until life requires them for you.
     
  11. Oct 8, 2004 #10

    Gokul43201

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    Perhaps this thread belongs in the Debunking forum ?
     
  12. Oct 8, 2004 #11
    What about the philosophy forum. Maybe he could explain it better there.
     
  13. Oct 8, 2004 #12

    Ivan Seeking

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    I don't agree. Just recently there was a discussion about this [I think on PBS] with an investment analyst who stated that historically, stocks are a bad investment. He cited numbers related to life savings lost by retired people, investment cycles, recessions and the depression, and I don't remember all of the details but his point seemed well made at the time. I'll look around later for a link.

    Another example that comes to mind is something that was done every year for many years - the monkey picks. In New York, every year somebody [maybe the NY Times] had a monkey throw darts at a dartboard to select stock picks. The next year these were compared to stocks recommended by one of the top investment companies. The monkey often won; which may explain why I haven't seen it for a long time. This fact was quite famous when I was a kid.

    Recently there was an economic model that threatened to offer solid predictors that could be used to determine stock selections. It looked really good until the dotcom crash. I guess the model completely failed when the market turned. [This may have been on the same show where I saw the stock analyst mentioned above].
     
  14. Oct 8, 2004 #13

    Evo

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    Ah, but I didn't say stocks were a good investment or that there was no risk. What I was pointing out was the difference between pure gambling (tossing dice for example) or making an informed decision on what to invest in.

    Where most people that dabble in the stock market go wrong is that they dabble. They don't know what they are doing, so in essence they are gambling. To make money, or at least avoid losing everything, you must do a lot of studying about the company you are interested in, the competition, their track record, personal information about the company's executives, research on new products or technology in other sectors that could produce something that could destroy the market for this company in the future. You must read everything constantly that is going on to get a feel for where things are headed and know when to bail out. Or trust a stockbroker who's job it is to do all of this. You must diversify your portfolio, which is an even greater strain to keep abreast of what is happening.

    I used to date a commodities broker in Chicago. :surprised He made millions. But he had to keep his ear to the ground on every seemingly insignificant event worldwide and try to "make the connections" including weather trends, knowing what climate conditions today will trigger insect swarms in some tiny part of Africa next year which mean that a certain crop in Kansas will be more valuable two years from now.

    Playing blackjack or poker is nothing like the stockmarket, commodities or futures. Sure it's a risk, so is buying a house or car or getting a dog that destroys everything you own. :cry:
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2004
  15. Oct 8, 2004 #14
    I can make money at anything I wish I do not because it is a hollow prospect. I was 13 when I understood this. To make money from the blood of others is this a good thing? If I can make money from the market others must lose or earth must suffer from the expansion of humanity to support the pyramid game. If you will not look I cannot show it to you and if you look I don't have to show it you for you can see for yourself.

    I find this quite scarry that none of you see this. This is an obvious point and all humans have infinite potential ability so please think this over. All of you.
     
  16. Oct 8, 2004 #15

    Evo

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    Alright TENYEARS, I'll bite. I've already explained why you are wrong. But I will give you the chance to show us your obvious point.

    Scenario - My client, a flour milling company. The owner finds a way to more efficiently mill flour with less waste, less energy required, better for the environment and safer for his employees. Ultimately his company's stock is worth more. I make more money.

    Please state who is losing and suffering here.
     
  17. Oct 8, 2004 #16

    Ivan Seeking

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    True. Unless you wish to become an expert your chances are not so good. Of course, you can put your money in the hand of those who make money the old fashion way; they churn it.
     
  18. Oct 9, 2004 #17

    russ_watters

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    The stock market is a good investment as long as you're not stupid about it. At its most fundamental, you're betting that the American economy will grow - and over all but the shortest timeframes (1-2 years), it does. And the stock market over only slightly longer timeframes (10-15 years) is always a winner. There has never been a 15 year period in US history in which the stock market has lost value.
    Thats true but that doesn't make the stock market a loser, it just means that if you follow the rules, any monkey can make money. Ie, you don't need a broker or a managed mutual fund.
    That's simply not true (I think you miss the point). The point of the monkey example is that even a monkey can make money on the stock market. Its just that you can't expect to be a quick milionaire like Evo's friend. The big winners and big losers are the exception, not the rule. The vast majority of investors are people holding stocks for decades in a retirement plan. What the stock market is virtually guaranteed to provide you if ou follow that is a couple of million dollars to retire on.

    In betting, odds are based on the fraction of the money taken in vs paid out. A good bet at a casino made over and over, such as black on a roulette wheel will yeild you something like a 95% return - for every $100 you put in (for example, 50 $2 bets in a row), you'll get $95 back. Obviously, that's a losing proposition, but not a terrible one (slots, on the other hand...). If you play long enough, the odds will eventually catch up with you and you'll lose. But the stock market has had an average of a 112% yearly return over its history. Long term, its a winning bet - throw darts at the NY times or hire a monkey to pick your stocks for you, it doesn't matter - if you spread your money out and let the odds take over, eventually they will take over and make you a winner.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2004
  19. Oct 9, 2004 #18

    Ivan Seeking

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    I'm sure the Enron investors would agree.
     
  20. Oct 9, 2004 #19
    The water is always there, drink if you thristy.
     
  21. Oct 9, 2004 #20

    Evo

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    The cheese is blue, eat if you're hungry.

    I take it you aren't able to back up your claim then?
     
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