Gas ignition limitation

  • #1
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So, this is just a simple question that crossed my mind. When say, a blowtorch or propane tank is ignited, how does the entire canister not go up in flames? How does the flame only stay on the outside and not burn through to the inside where the gas supply is? Will whatever principle this works off of work for any gas, even something as flammable as hydrogen? Thanks in advance for anyone who knows.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Borek
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Do you know what the fire triangle is?
 
  • #3
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Do you know what the fire triangle is?
I expected it to be something this simple. Is the fire not able to burn what's in the container simply because there's no oxygen in the container? If so, what would happen if oxygen was one of the gasses in the container?
 
  • #4
Borek
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Is the fire not able to burn what's in the container simply because there's no oxygen in the container?
Yes.

If so, what would happen if oxygen was one of the gasses in the container?
Apply fire triangle again. Preferably keeping the distance though.

explosion.jpg
 
  • #5
79
2
Yes.



Apply fire triangle again. Preferably keeping the distance though.

View attachment 115275
By keeping the distance, do you mean the gasses would be kept in sepearate containers like a welding torch?
 
  • #6
Borek
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No, I mean don't stand too close to the tank while testing the idea :wink:
 
  • #7
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No, I mean don't stand too close to the tank while testing the idea :wink:
In that case, do you have any recommendations for how to ignite it from a distance? Maybe some sort of fuse?
 
  • #8
Borek
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Why do you want to use a bomb in the first place?
 
  • #9
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Why do you want to use a bomb in the first place?
I was performing electrolysis with water to get oxygen, and was wondering if it was at all possible to use the excess hydrogen for something like a blowtorch. That's why I was wondering whether it could sustain a flame, or just blow up the canister.
 
  • #10
Borek
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What is wrong about collecting the hydrogen in a tank and mixing it with the air in the burner?
 
  • #11
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What is wrong about collecting the hydrogen in a tank and mixing it with the air in the burner?
Wouldn't that provide a way for all of the gas to ignite and explode at once instead of fueling a flame?
 
  • #12
Borek
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Wouldn't that provide a way for all of the gas to ignite and explode at once instead of fueling a flame?
You have already answered that question in the post #3.
 
  • #13
rbelli1
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Why do you want to use a bomb in the first place?
Myth-busters style experimentation. If all else fails add more dynamite.

BoB
 
  • #14
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Hydrogen, or whatever is in the tank, is contained by a structure made of iron or similar. (though very small amounts can escape)
You'll have to melt the container first before the Hydrogen can react with anything outside of the container.
 

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