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Gas Laws

  1. Oct 13, 2008 #1
    If 0.5 mol of nitrigen gas occupies a volume of 11.2 L at 0 degrees Celsius, what volume will 2 mol of nitrogen gas occupy at the same temperature and pressure?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 13, 2008 #2

    LowlyPion

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    Welcome to PF.

    What is your thinking about how to approach the problem?
     
  4. Oct 13, 2008 #3
    all i really need help with is the pressure... i have the formula for the problem i think (boyle's law) but i do not know the what the pressure is...
     
  5. Oct 13, 2008 #4

    LowlyPion

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    What happens when you divide one equation by the other?
     
  6. Oct 13, 2008 #5
    i dont know...boyles law states P x V = constant....and i dont know what the pressure is
     
  7. Oct 13, 2008 #6
    is 44.8 L/mol is the answer?
     
  8. Oct 13, 2008 #7

    nicksauce

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    I would almost agree, but it asks for the volume it occupies, not the volume per mol. I get 44.8 L as an answer.
     
  9. Oct 13, 2008 #8

    LowlyPion

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    That's what it looks like except drop the /mol.
     
  10. Oct 13, 2008 #9

    nicksauce

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    I don't think Boyle's law applies if the amount of material changes. I would think the ideal gas law should be applied instead. PV=nRT (n = number of moles, R = gas constant, T = temperature).
     
  11. Oct 13, 2008 #10
    alrighty, thanks...
     
  12. Oct 13, 2008 #11
    Should Boyle's Law be used in this problem, since the temperature remains constant:

    What is the volume of an ideal gas at 1 atm, 12 L, and 25 degrees Celsius if the pressure is decreased to 0.8 atm at 25 degrees Celsius?
     
  13. Oct 13, 2008 #12

    nicksauce

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  14. Oct 13, 2008 #13
    May I recommend that instead of memorizing or search for different laws for different problems you could simply ALWAYS apply the Ideal Gas Law since ,Charles', Boyles' and Avagadro's Laws are simply special cases of the I.G. Law.
     
  15. Oct 13, 2008 #14

    LowlyPion

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    Strictly speaking you should consider using the Ideal Gas Law PV = nRT.

    To find unknowns in situations that some things change and others don't, then divide the two equations such that

    P1V1/P2V2 = n1R1T1/n2R2T2

    Just cross out the things that don't change between 1 and 2.
     
  16. Oct 13, 2008 #15
    is the answer v2=15 L?
     
  17. Oct 13, 2008 #16

    LowlyPion

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    You've already posted the answer. Are you answering another problem?
     
  18. Oct 13, 2008 #17
    yes, is that the answer to the following: What is the volume of an ideal gas at 1 atm, 12 L, and 25 degrees Celsius if the pressure is decreased to 0.8 atm at 25 degrees Celsius?
     
  19. Oct 13, 2008 #18
    yes, is that the answer to the following: What is the volume of an ideal gas at 1 atm, 12 L, and 25 degrees Celsius if the pressure is decreased to 0.8 atm at 25 degrees Celsius?
     
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