Gauss law in divergence form

  • Thread starter Nikitin
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Hey. I want to use integrals-math to get from Gauss law in divergence form to the one in integral form. I know you can do it by simply accepting ∇*E dV = ρ/ε => ∫ ∇*E dV= ∫ρ/εdV = Q/ε = ∫E*dA, but I wanna do it another way. I want to begin with ∫∇*E*dV and end up with Q/ε.

So: E = Q*v/(4pi*ε*|r|2), where v is the directional vector of r: v= D/|r| = [x,y,z]/√(x2+y2+z2).

Thus,

∫∇*EdV = ∫∇*v*[Q/(4pi*ε*|r|2)] dV = Q/(4pi*ε)*∫ ∇*D*|r|-3 dV =

Q/(4pi*ε)*∫(1 + 1 +1)*|r|-3 dV = 3*Q/(4pi*ε)*∫|r|-3 dV.

However, I can't seem to solve the integral ∫|r|-3dV using spherical coordinates, as I get that it is infinitely large.. So can you guys assist me? Does perhaps ∫|r|-3dV = |r|-3 ∫ dV = 4pi/3?
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
vela
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You didn't take the divergence correctly. You can't ignore the 1/r3 part when differentiating.
 
  • #3
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ahh, yeah. Thanks allot! :)
 

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