Gauss's Law in differential form

  • Thread starter ehrenfest
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  • #1
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Homework Statement


Gauss's Law is often given as:

[tex]\nabla \cdot \vec{E} = \rho/ \epsilon_0 [/tex]

However E is, in general a function of position, so the equation is really
[tex]\nabla \cdot \vec{E}(\vec{r}) = \rho(\vec{r}) /\epsilon_0[/tex]
correct?

Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution

 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
pam
455
1
Yes. The (r) is often left out, but understood.
Just apply the divrgence theorem to get Gauss's integral law.
 

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