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Gay Gene

  1. May 27, 2010 #1
    I searched this term on Google and I only got religious results.

    What are the current views held by the scientific community? I tend to think there is a gay gene, but I can't find any sources.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 27, 2010 #2
    Sounds like you've answered your own question. :smile:
     
  4. May 27, 2010 #3

    DaveC426913

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    The terms you Googled will give biased results.

    Try Googling 'homosexuality' and 'genetic' or 'heredity'.
     
  5. May 27, 2010 #4
    I stand humbly corrected. It would be nice however if there were no search results.
     
  6. May 27, 2010 #5
    Impossible...
    However when you are looking for papers or sources that are 'of quality' I'd suggest you use google scholar:
    http://scholar.google.ca/scholar?q=homosexuality+genetics&hl=en&as_sdt=0&as_vis=1&oi=scholart

    27,500 results and many citations. I'd suggest you first take a look at the studies done on the twins. In my opinion there is no such thing as a 'gay gene' however it does seem quite likely that some genes combined with particular enviromental factors will make a person have a higher probability of being a homosexual.
     
  7. May 27, 2010 #6

    mgb_phys

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    Google used to have a page apologising for the results if you searched for "jew" rather than jewish/hebrew/judaic - just because the particular term was used by a certain political segment.
     
  8. May 27, 2010 #7
    You mean this:
    http://www.google.com/explanation.html [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  9. May 27, 2010 #8
    I'm not sure if this entire post is in response to mine or not.
     
  10. May 27, 2010 #9
    *sigh*
     
  11. May 27, 2010 #10

    Evo

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    continued

    http://www.qmul.ac.uk/news/newsrelease.php?news_id=1075 [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  12. May 29, 2010 #11

    epenguin

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    I think these attempts to say there is a gene or genes for something which is partly conscious or free choice and partly a socially or ideologically related tendency are, even when they, as not always, are clear and true, are a philosophical category mistake.

    Take a more extreme example. People try to make relations between genes and which political party you vote for. But that would have no meaning in even a different country or historical epoch.

    It is more likely that the genes could be related with temperamental tendencies or general psychological types. Things like degrees of extroversion, neuroticism, any number of psychological categorisations. Then a given temperament might be more likely in one society with a given ideological background to vote for a particular kind of politics, or have more tendency to go for a given type of sexual orientation or for that matter a given profession. There are not genes for professions surely – but probably you could find the same sort of correlational evidence that would show that there are. And even the science of psychological type seems to me a bit dubious and at best its categorisations are rather culture-limited.
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2010
  13. May 29, 2010 #12
  14. May 29, 2010 #13

    arildno

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    You should also check out SimonLeVay's homepage.

    In the 1990s, the neurologist LeVay published an article in "Science" that indicated that a particular region in the male hypothalamus was about half the size among men known to have been gay when alive, against the size of the same region among (presumably) straight men.

    For 3 other, adjacent regions in the hypothalamus, there were no similar differences.

    It had been well-known for a long time that the brain is slightly dimorphic; women typically have halved sizes of two of the mentioned hypothalamic regions compared to the males, one of them being the same as the one found halved among gays.

    On LeVay's site, you can find links to two other studies confirming his initial findings, one on gay men&heterosexuals, the other on "gay" wethers compared to ordinary wethers:
    http://www.simonlevay.com/
     
  15. May 29, 2010 #14

    DaveC426913

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    I've never heard this term before. A quick dictionary check pulls up "castrated ram". Is that what you're referring to?
     
  16. May 29, 2010 #15
    Consider hormonal habituation, starting in utero, and perpetuated by environmental factors, such as diet, behavior and, indirectly, belief.

    A mother's biochemistry is effected by a great many things and hormonal changes during pregnancy are expected.

    People actually take hormones to effect biological and psychological changes.
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2010
  17. May 29, 2010 #16
    Why didn't I think to use Google Scholar? Thanks for reminding me of that useful tool, I'll be sure to use it in the future.
     
  18. May 30, 2010 #17

    arildno

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    Mea culpa.

    In Norwegian, "wether" would be the english word closest to the one we use for what you call a "ram".

    So, I falsely assumed you used "wether" in the same sense..
     
  19. May 30, 2010 #18

    lisab

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    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/wether" [Broken]; it's just not a commonly used term. I think it's used for castrated goats, too.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  20. May 30, 2010 #19
    Keep in mind that the DNA/RNA mechanism is not deterministic. It functions to produce proteins. If you were to bottle and sell those proteins, you'd have to list their effects, along with possible side effects.

    An individual protein may have many uses inside the body. The genes that cooperate to produce that given protein should be identified as part of a group that supplies the protein for all of those uses.
     
  21. Jun 8, 2010 #20
    I think have
     
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