Geiger Counter and Potential Difference

In summary, the conversation discusses finding the potential difference between a central wire and a hollow cylinder to produce an electric field of 2.00*10^4 V/m at a distance of 1.20 cm from the axis of the wire. The problem relates to the concept of concentric conductors and involves determining the relationship between potential difference, electric field, and distance for the given values of radius.
  • #1
LostinPhysics
3
0
In this problem I am getting stuck on how to find the potential difference. I don't know where to begin. In a Geiger Counter suppose the radius of the central wire is 145 micrometers and the radius of a hollow cylinder is 1.80 cm. What potential difference between the wire and the cylinder produces an electric field of 2.00*10^4 V/m at a distance of 1.20 cm from the axis of the wire?
 
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  • #2
Think back to the physics problem of the electric field of concentric (coaxial) conductors.

What is the relationship between V, E and r for concentric conductors?

The radius of the outer conductor is 1.8 cm (18 mm), radius of central wire is 145 microns (0.145 mm), and one is asked for V at 1.2 cm. Make sure to use consistent units.
 
  • #3


I understand your frustration with this problem. However, with the information provided, we can use the formula for electric field, E = V/d, where V is the potential difference and d is the distance from the axis of the wire. We also know that the electric field is 2.00*10^4 V/m at a distance of 1.20 cm. Therefore, we can rearrange the formula to solve for V, giving us V = Ed. Plugging in the values, we get V = (2.00*10^4 V/m) * (1.20 cm) = 24,000 V. This would be the potential difference between the wire and the cylinder that would produce an electric field of 2.00*10^4 V/m at a distance of 1.20 cm from the axis of the wire. I hope this helps!
 

Related to Geiger Counter and Potential Difference

1. What is a Geiger Counter and how does it work?

A Geiger Counter is a type of radiation detection device that measures the presence and intensity of ionizing radiation. It works by using a tube filled with gas and electrodes, which creates an electric field. When radiation passes through the tube, it ionizes the gas particles, causing a small electric current. This current is then amplified and counted, giving a reading of the radiation levels.

2. What is the purpose of using a Geiger Counter?

The main purpose of using a Geiger Counter is for radiation detection and monitoring. It is commonly used in industries such as nuclear power plants, medical facilities, and laboratories to ensure the safety of workers and the public. It is also used in environmental studies to measure background radiation levels and detect any potential sources of radiation.

3. How is the potential difference calculated in a Geiger Counter?

The potential difference in a Geiger Counter is the voltage applied between the electrodes of the gas-filled tube. This voltage is typically in the range of a few hundred volts and is necessary to create the electric field needed for the ionization of gas particles. The potential difference is measured in volts and can be adjusted depending on the type of radiation being detected.

4. What are the safety precautions when using a Geiger Counter?

When using a Geiger Counter, it is important to follow safety precautions to avoid exposure to harmful radiation. This includes wearing protective gear, such as gloves and a lab coat, and using the device at a safe distance from the radiation source. It is also essential to properly calibrate and maintain the Geiger Counter to ensure accurate readings and minimize any potential risks.

5. Can a Geiger Counter detect all types of radiation?

No, a Geiger Counter can only detect ionizing radiation, which includes alpha, beta, and gamma rays. It cannot detect non-ionizing radiation, such as radio waves or visible light. Additionally, some types of ionizing radiation, such as neutrons, may not be easily detected by a Geiger Counter and may require specialized equipment.

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