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Gender-neutral personal names?

  1. Apr 7, 2007 #1

    arildno

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    Due to a misunderstanding on my part in another thread, I began to wonder:
    What first names do you know of that are gender-neutral?

    Here in Norway, just about the only two I know that can be used for either sex is Chris and Kim. (In Norwegian that is, but I think those two are gender neutral in English-speaking countries as well).

    What others are there in your language?
    (I believe Leslie/Lesley is male/female, but I'm not sure..)
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2007
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  3. Apr 7, 2007 #2

    radou

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    There are a few examples in my language, for example, "Matija" or "Vanja". They are not unfrequent names, and are almost equally distributed through both genders.
     
  4. Apr 7, 2007 #3

    Kurdt

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    There are a few websites for gender neutral names but this one caught my eye because it compares frequency between genders.

    http://www.bnbg.net/gender-neutral.html
     
  5. Apr 7, 2007 #4

    Danger

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    I believe that the names of Frank Zappa's children are interchangeable...
     
  6. Apr 7, 2007 #5
    alex and chris
     
  7. Apr 7, 2007 #6
    Seven (10 Char)
     
  8. Apr 7, 2007 #7
    kelly? leslie? ok, those aren't totally 'neutral' but I know guys with those names.

    Terry is definitely a gender neutral name, but for guys it is spelled "terry", whereas for girls it is spelled "Teri".
     
  9. Apr 7, 2007 #8

    Lisa!

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    I can think of lots of name in our language that's used for both sexes like my own name! Of course it rarely happens that a name is equally used for either sexes.
    1 of my classmates had the same name and it was really funny when some of forgetful professors always called me Mr X and called him Mrs Y.:rolleyes: Of course it rarely happens that a name is equally used for either sexes.

    As a side note in our language we use the same pronoun for both sexes!
     
  10. Apr 7, 2007 #9

    Danger

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    Do you mean that there's no 'he' or 'she'? What about 'his' and 'hers'? How do you buy towels?
     
  11. Apr 7, 2007 #10

    arildno

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    Thus, post-modernively, it is proven that genders don't exist in Lisa!'s home-country. :smile:
     
  12. Apr 7, 2007 #11

    Chi Meson

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    Not "Mickey"?
     
  13. Apr 7, 2007 #12
    Every once in a while you will come across a guy named Ashley or Lindsey, seems like they are both girl names to me but it happens. It is fairly common for girls to be named Erin, and guys Aaron, different spelling same pronounciation.
     
  14. Apr 7, 2007 #13

    Math Is Hard

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    Pat
    http://www.mikeylikey.com/wp-content/uploads/2006/03/pat.jpg [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 2, 2017
  15. Apr 7, 2007 #14

    Tom Mattson

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    That would be home planet. :rofl:
     
  16. Apr 7, 2007 #15

    arildno

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    Quite so. :smile:
     
  17. Apr 7, 2007 #16

    ShawnD

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    [/URL]

    I always assumed pat was a wuss of a man. It just seemed to make sense.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 2, 2017
  18. Apr 8, 2007 #17
    But of course the actress playing Pat was female, although I agree that the evidence slightly tilts to wuss male.

    Other english neutral names are Alex (Alexander/Alexandra), ronnie/roni (Ronald/Veronica), and Drew/Dru.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2007
  19. Apr 8, 2007 #18

    ShawnD

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    Seems like you can also substitute Y for I to turn something into a girl's name, but doing it makes you a jerk of a parent. How does your daughter's boyfriend feel when he tells his parents he's dating somebody named Toni? Probably the same way you would feel when your daughter is dating somebody named Sasa (pronounced "Sasha").
     
  20. Apr 8, 2007 #19
    I once knew a girl named Lindsey who was dating a guy named Lindsey
     
  21. Apr 8, 2007 #20
    sheer insanity.
     
  22. Apr 8, 2007 #21

    ShawnD

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    They should name all of their kids Lindsey just for the fun of it all :biggrin:
     
  23. Apr 8, 2007 #22
    When naming a child, at least in North America, it's worth keeping in mind that a gender-neutral name will likely be predominantly feminine by the time the child is in high school. Why is the drift only in one direction?
     
  24. Apr 9, 2007 #23

    ShawnD

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    Probably the same reason women can wear pants but men cannot wear dresses. Don't know what it is, but it's probably the same :wink:
     
  25. Apr 9, 2007 #24
    Ashley, Jorden, Lee, Sam, Ty, Taylor, Robyn, Jem, Arnie, chris, dani, kim, Jackie, Jo, Kieran, Morgan, Nic, Pat, Phil, Stacy... these are just a few there are heaps of "gender neutral" names and they are becoming more and more popular
     
  26. Apr 9, 2007 #25

    Integral

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    Don't forget Dale Evans and a Boy named Sue! (Ok, so my age is showing, do a web search)

    Does a famous counter example make a name gender neutral?

    Actually in English ALL names are gender neutral, since our language does not specify gender in the name. Gender association is a learned thing in English, what is now a purely male name could become a female name, given a shift in a couple of generations or a region or 2.
     
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