1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

General Science degree

  1. Apr 10, 2006 #1
    hi

    i am wondering if it is possible in this day and age to study a science degree that specialise in all 3 science of biology, chemistry and physics?

    i have been contemplating about biochemistry which melds chemistry and biology but i also like physics and would like to specialise in that field if possible.

    does anyone know if that is possible today?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 10, 2006 #2
    Perhaps something like molecular biophysics?
     
  4. Apr 10, 2006 #3

    Hootenanny

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I know the Cambridge do a natural sciences degree, which allows you to chose modules for any of the science degrees. I friend told me that they make you do mostly mathematics in your first year though.
     
  5. Apr 10, 2006 #4

    0rthodontist

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    At my school there is a Science major, which offers a general broad education in science at an introductory level. It is not intended for graduate or professional work, but rather for teachers, science writers, or science "administrators." It doesn't sound particularly rigorous since if you are going for breadth, you don't get to take many advanced courses.

    You could just do a triple major in biology, chemistry, and physics, or make one or two of those into a minor. A double major in biochemistry and physics might be an option.

    If you have not started college yet then I think you don't have to decide now. Even if you have started college then you can take the introductory courses in physics and biochemistry, and then decide what you like more.
     
  6. Apr 11, 2006 #5

    rho

    User Avatar

    Well i wouldn't say it's mostly maths in the first year. There is a lot of maths but you do get to do three experimental courses in the first year from this list: http://www.cam.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/courses/natsci/part1a.html
     
  7. Apr 11, 2006 #6
    i am at university of queensland first year. i am taking all 3 sciences except that the physics that i am taking is not calculus based (thank god!!!). how bad is physics + integration/differentiation ?
     
  8. Apr 11, 2006 #7

    ZapperZ

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    Please note that a "general science" degree, by definition, does not provide you with a "specialized" knowledge of any of those fields. You do not graduate with the same level of knowledge in chemistry, biology, and physics as those who majored in chemistry, biology, or physics. That is just impossible to do, unless you triple major in all of them.

    Zz.
     
  9. Apr 11, 2006 #8
    Most programs I've seen that are general science are geared towards producing high school science teachers.
     
  10. Apr 11, 2006 #9

    JasonRox

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    It's actually easier in my opinion.

    That's if you are good with Calculus.
     
  11. Apr 12, 2006 #10
    i did intergration and differentiation back in high school and it was almost 3 years ago :redface: i did excel in mathematics and earning a 2nd highest distinction in it, so it would be safe to say i probably can handle physics with calculus

    as zapperz pointed out, wat i really hope to do is to triple major in all 3 sciences, is it possible to do that in this day and age where everything is so specialized?
     
  12. Apr 12, 2006 #11

    ZapperZ

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    If you have unlimited time, unlimited resources, unlimited ability, and unlimited patience, you can major in all three. There's nothing to prevent you from doing that.

    And then, you have to decide what exactly you want to be when you grow up. Most people tend to some some clue already BEFORE embarking on such a project.

    Zz.
     
  13. Apr 12, 2006 #12

    G01

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    This is my opinion. You can either know alot about one thing and a little about everything else, or you can know something about everything, but not enough about anything.

    Scientists are in the first group. A scientist specializes in one field and works with others who specialize in other things and together they get the job done. You do not need to major in all three sciences to be successful. In fact if you do the triple major track, you may end up in the second group, knowing something about everything, but not enough about anything. My sugestion is to think hard about which science you prefer the most and study that one. To say that you like them all and cant decide is just delaying the inevitable. Everyone eventually needs to decide what they want to do. If you want to teach general science in high school, then go ahead and major in general science, but if you want to do research, or teach at a university level, then your going to eventually have to decide. And, yes if you choose biology you will not learn as much about physics as a physics major, but if you have to know anything about physics for your research, you probably going to end up working with a physicist. Good luck to you.
     
  14. Apr 12, 2006 #13

    0rthodontist

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    I am planning a double major with a minor if I can fit it in, and I don't think you necessarily have to lose on specific strength depending on what choices you make. Computer science and math are extremely related, and the strength I am sacrificing by majoring in both is the software design and "technician" type knowledge. But since I am not so interested in those, this does not kill me. In other words, depending on how much course choice you have, you may be able to specialize _within each major_ in a way that leads towards a single cross-major goal.

    Depending on your situation, I don't think you have to decide right now what career path you want. So long as you have at least one skill that can support you, you're ok. Apparently many educated people change their field of work not infrequently in the course of their lives.

    Your best bet if you want to triple major is to take a lot of tests to exempt out of degree requirements, max out on your course load, and take summer and winter courses when offered.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2006
  15. Apr 14, 2006 #14
    i'd most likely stick with a biology + chemistry (biochem) since my physics marks arent as good as the other 2 subjects. frankly, based on past experience i tend to suck in newtonian physics but i did better with the general relativity and quantum physics part. does that happen alot with ppl in the physics world?

    for those who excel in physics, how do u study this subject? my approach has been to do alot of maths and read up. but i dun quite understand all the concept when i read it and my english isnt very good either.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2006
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: General Science degree
Loading...