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Generating Heat

  1. Jan 11, 2012 #1
    Lets say I have some tape with powder copper inside the glue of the tape (doesn't have to be copper). The goal is to heat the tape so that its capable of melting small amounts of ice on the surface of the tape. The tape is wrapped around a surface about 3" tall 1/4" thick and 8" wide. On the surface and under the tape is a very thin pad containing the "stuff" that needs to heat up the powder copper glue mix which heats up the tape itself, then melting the ice.

    Any Ideas on what this substance could be and how it would work? Possibly a small electric current that could be created? Chemical reactions? The heat needs to last for one hour.

    Thanks,
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2012
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 11, 2012 #2

    Drakkith

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    I don't see why there needs to be anything in the glue of the tape. You could tape some of those heating pads you stick in gloves to whatever you need to heat up.
     
  4. Jan 11, 2012 #3

    DaveC426913

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    Why don't you just tell us the bigger picture of what you are trying to accomplish and we'll see if we can help you find a solution. This is too much like a bunch of blind men describing an elephant.
     
  5. Jan 12, 2012 #4
    The goal is to create heat on the outside of the tape. The tape would be used on a hockey stick blade. To prevent ice build up. The weight and size is a huge factor as you obviously can't have a giant heat pad under neath the tape of your stick. I'm looking for way to create a prototype of this idea.

    I figured a thin sticker stuck to the face of the blade, also spanning the whole width of the blade and height. When in close proximity with the tape ( which is applied directly on top of the thin sticker ) creates heat on the tape. Or a small electric current that is capable of warming the blade and tape so that ice will melt. Another idea is have some kind of chemical or substance that is with in the tape, then you have a solution you apply to the face of your blade before you go on the ice. This solution when mixed with the other creates heat which would prevent ice and decrease friction.

    I guess im looking for a little direction, or reasons why its not very dependable, safe, efficient anything helps.

    Thanks a lot.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2012
  6. Jan 12, 2012 #5

    DaveC426913

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    You might have better luck with chemical treatments rather than heat. Dip your stick in saltwater? :smile:
     
  7. Jan 12, 2012 #6
    I like the way you think. :)
     
  8. Jan 12, 2012 #7
    Well, they already make hockey tape that is sticky on both sides. You could find a way to adhear a thin layer of salt on the outside of the tape. Some people rub wax on their stick blade after it has been taped in order to help try to protect the tape. Perhaps you could create a wax/salt stick that could be rubbed on which would help both to protect the tape and also to prevent ice accumulation.
     
  9. Jan 12, 2012 #8
    When he replied, that was my thought. Only I was thinking a spray.. but yes very similar idea. Its a cool idea and will try to implement it into a prototype..

    Would you think a spray or almost like deodorant stick would be better? I think a spray would be cool because of the fact its quick and covers the whole area evenly.

    How would you go about making a wax that's liquid under pressure but when it hits air it solidifies? lol just a thought..
     
  10. Jan 12, 2012 #9

    Drakkith

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    I was not aware that ice buildup on hockey sticks was a problem. Where is the ice buildup the worst and why?
     
  11. Jan 12, 2012 #10
    The blade of the stick.. From collecting snow while moving the puck, it eventually freezes.
     
  12. Jan 12, 2012 #11

    AlephZero

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    Would a water repellent coating do the job? If the snow or water doesn't stay on the blade, it can't freeze.

    I don't know what coating material would survive the impacts from playing the game without damage, though.
     
  13. Jan 12, 2012 #12

    Drakkith

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    Ok, that's what I was thinking.
     
  14. Jan 12, 2012 #13
    That's a cool thought, what chemical is used in water repellant?
     
  15. Jan 12, 2012 #14

    DaveC426913

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    Well, WD-40...
     
  16. Jan 12, 2012 #15
    :) you do not cease to amaze me.
     
  17. Jan 12, 2012 #16

    Bobbywhy

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  18. Jan 12, 2012 #17
    Thanks bobby!
     
  19. Jan 14, 2012 #18

    Bobbywhy

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    CAUTION! I forgot to mention that many of those deicing chemicals are toxic! Meaning they are poisonous to humans. Please use prudence if you plan to try to use them in a hockey game. Check with the coach, the school adminstrators, or other competent scientists for guidance. You could possibly poison someone (if they licked the hockey stick blade) and may become liable!
     
  20. Jan 16, 2012 #19
    No worries, I plan on staying green friendly as much as I can.
     
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