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Medical Getting use to uncomfortable positions

  1. Sep 30, 2005 #1

    Pengwuino

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    Ok i was wondering something. Does your mind or body "get use" to uncomfortable positions after a while? I remember when I got this new computer chair, I hated it because the keyboard was low as hell and very uncomfortable. Now I don't even feel anything uncomfortable!

    Same with my car... it wasn't bad but it was still noticably uncomfortable. Now after a few years, it feel slike a snug lil glove :D
     
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  3. Sep 30, 2005 #2

    somasimple

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    Hi,

    It is called accommodation.
    Brain when stimulated with prolonged unpleasant stimulus trends to forget it.
     
  4. Oct 1, 2005 #3

    honestrosewater

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    The following is merely speculation: The positions you mention may not be painful per se, just unfamiliar. That is, you may have 'learned' for things to be positioned in one way, and when that changes, your having to relearn the new positions manifests as some kind of 'discomfort'. You could test this by learning the positions in reverse order (the 'comfortable' position after the 'uncomfortable' position).
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2005
  5. Oct 1, 2005 #4

    somasimple

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    hmmm,
    well, sitting positions is a strong provider of low back pain. Not a speculative idea but studies' results. :wink:
     
  6. Oct 1, 2005 #5

    honestrosewater

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    Sorry, I meant that my post was merely speculation. I'll clarify it.
     
  7. Oct 2, 2005 #6
    Isn't it just that your body gets used to stretching its muscles in a certain way? Like when stretching hurts at first, but then you stretch out the muscles enough in certain ways to fit. Like with braces, hurts like hell at first but then the roots in your mouth shift. Or is accommodation involved in this too?
     
  8. Oct 2, 2005 #7

    somasimple

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    Hi,
    yes and no.
    Stretching muscles is another more complex question question.

    Accommodation:
    If you're in a room where inner temperature is 20°C, you feel not really if it warm or cold. The majority of us will taste it as good.
    Now, if you enter (from the previous one) in a room where temperature is 27°C thus you feel that it is hot but only because the previous was colder. Brain can track difference but not °C. In few minutes, you feel no more the warmth, accomodation worked again because brain estimated that it wasn't a dangerous temperature.
     
  9. Oct 3, 2005 #8

    Moonbear

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    That phrase is an important one. Accomodation (or adaptation) is only going to work for a non-noxious stimulus...an odor that isn't associated with any danger, or the sound of other people talking in the background while you're trying to read a book.

    When it comes to sitting positions, if it was really an uncomfortable position, the pain would probably intensify warning of pending injury rather than dissipating. More likely, your chair got more broken in and formed to your body shape more, or you strengthened your muscles so you could support the new position more comfortably.
     
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