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Glueing plastic back together

  1. Jan 2, 2006 #1

    Pengwuino

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    Does anyone know a good product that will glue plastics back together? The plastic is... well... pretty much the kind you'll find on, oh, lets just say, my mothers computer case. It also needs to set somewhat fast because i'd have to hold things in place :mad:

    And while we're at it, does anyone know how to dissolve epoxy or somehow remove it? I need to get rid of my first futile attempt to glue the dang thing back together....
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 2, 2006 #2
    Sorry, epox is not comming off. Cyanoacrylate would work, but its not great. You were right to use epoxy the first time, but you should have taken your time. Use 5min epoxy.
     
  4. Jan 2, 2006 #3

    russ_watters

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    Epoxy really should be able to do it. What kind were you using?
     
  5. Jan 3, 2006 #4

    Pengwuino

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    I was using some hobby 5 minute epoxy. I need to correct myself on the first post, one of the chairs we have is broken because the plastic base started tearing and i tried to... "paint" the epoxy on and im pretty sure that didn't work. I also half-assed it so that probably contributed to the suckyness of the bond. The problem is that the chair, i need to actually put a lot of force to keep the plastic tears together .... and for 5 minutes... and hope it cures quickly enough after that 5 minutes so that i can release it and it will still hold.

    Such a tiring day!!!
     
  6. Jan 3, 2006 #5
    Figure something out to hold it in place instead of having you hold it. Or, go search for illegals walking around town and offer then ten bucks to sit there for an hour holding it together.
     
  7. Jan 3, 2006 #6

    Pengwuino

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    $10???? That's probably twice as much as they normally get for hauling around roofing supplies.
     
  8. Jan 3, 2006 #7

    DaveC426913

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    I say just fess up and take the heat. She's going to find out when she gets home anyway.
     
  9. Jan 3, 2006 #8

    Pengwuino

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    I didn't break something like some kid breaking their parents base while playen baseball inside. I was installing a new switch for her on her computer and this stupid hook piece broke off and I need it back on in order to close the case correctly.
     
  10. Jan 3, 2006 #9

    DaveC426913

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    ;-)


    If the hook is under any tension when in normal use don't even bother trying to glue it. No glue will hold versus direct tension placed on it.

    Got a camera? Take a pic of what you need to accomplish. You may need to jerry-rig it.
     
  11. Jan 3, 2006 #10

    Pengwuino

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    No its one of those... hmmm, you know when you have a square hole and theres a piece that goes into it with a triangular edge that snaps in place...

    Well that doesn't help.

    It's an easy fix its just I had to stand there and hold it in place while the epoxy dries which is annoying as hell.
     
  12. Jan 3, 2006 #11

    Astronuc

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    In the hobby world, one can usually use a little drop of cyano-acrylate to hold something in place while the epoxy cures.

    For many plastics, particularly ABS (acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene) one could use Tenex, assuming one can find it. It is a halo-alkane, e.g. methyl chloride or ethylene chloride. There is also Testors liquid. Most hobby shops that sell plastic models should have it.
     
  13. Jan 3, 2006 #12

    Pengwuino

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    Well im sticking with the straight epoxy. Im not running down to this damn 500% markup hobby store across town.
     
  14. Jan 3, 2006 #13

    Astronuc

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    What!? You don't want to support free-market captialism, the bedrock of the US economy!? :surprised I'm shocked - I'm mortified!
     
  15. Jan 3, 2006 #14

    Pengwuino

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    Supporting the free-market would result in me going 1 mile down the street to home depot where its like, 50% less.

    I'm just too lazy to actually go anywhere to be honest. Especially if its just for one stupid thing.
     
  16. Jan 3, 2006 #15

    DaveC426913

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    You can get it at many convenience stores that suffer from "product creep". i.e they have plastic model kits, and it costs about a dollar.
     
  17. Jan 3, 2006 #16

    Pengwuino

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    Oh damn it to hell. I guess when they say "full cure in 1 hour", they mean 1 hour. I tried to use it after 45 minutes and the thing is starting to come off
     
  18. Jan 3, 2006 #17

    Danger

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    As a staunch Red Green fan, I know the proper approach to this... but you probably won't do it.
     
  19. Jan 3, 2006 #18
    with 2 part epoxy, make sure you take the time to mix the two parts extremely well, for about a full minute or it will never cure right. I learned this lesson in an irritating way when setting some bolts in concrete to support a deck I was building last summer.
     
  20. Jan 3, 2006 #19
    Another glue anecdote: When I broke the leg on my oakley sunglasses which was a hard type plastic that is under quite a bend when on my big noggin, I used superglue, not epoxy. That bonded extremely well and never broke (at that spot) again.
     
  21. Jan 3, 2006 #20
    there was a show on glue the other day on discovery channel. my dad made me watch it...

    from what i recall from the show the best thing you can probably do is... oh wait, i fell asleep, never mind.
     
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