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Going below 0° Kelvin

  1. Dec 20, 2006 #1
    As there is nowhere in the Universe below 0° Kelvin. Could heat be considered a universal inconsistent medium?
    If we were to go below 0° Kelvin, would total inertia follow?
    Thanks,
    Glynis
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 20, 2006 #2

    EL

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  4. Dec 21, 2006 #3
    as there is no activity of atoms and molecules at that temperature,no movement no heat.
     
  5. Dec 21, 2006 #4
  6. Dec 21, 2006 #5

    EL

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    Mm, I saw that, but didn't want to confuse...
     
  7. Dec 21, 2006 #6

    Gokul43201

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    What in the heavens is a "universal inconsistent medium"?
    "Total inertia"? What's that?
     
  8. Dec 21, 2006 #7

    russ_watters

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    I'm sorry, but you've put a bunch of words together that doen't belong in the same sentences with each other. So I guess that means the answer to your questions is no.
     
  9. Dec 23, 2006 #8

    disregardthat

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    What about adding heat to a object moving almost at light speed. when the atoms are moving back and forth in their extreme heat, wouldnt it make the speed of the atoms exceed the speed of light when they move towards the direction of the object? of an atom moves at a speed of 50 000 km\s back and forth very fast. and an object is moving 270 000 km\s it would be 320 000 km\s? (Data is totally imaginary)
     
  10. Dec 23, 2006 #9

    Gokul43201

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    No, it wouldn't. That's not the correct way to add velocities.
     
  11. Dec 24, 2006 #10
    As Gokul said, and the reason is because you haven't considered the structure of geometry in which the atoms are contained in. This geometry is spacetime and all matter constains in it hence they must also obey its rules.
     
  12. Dec 24, 2006 #11

    disregardthat

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    Hmmm what rules are these then?

    The atoms at great speeds vibrate "slower" compared to a object standing still so they will always move just below the limit of c?
     
  13. Dec 24, 2006 #12

    ShawnD

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    Not to crap on the thread but this is the coolest quote ever. Should I make this my new signature or is thunderfvck's quote better? :biggrin:
     
  14. Dec 24, 2006 #13
    Beware of what you say here.

    T < O K IS POSSIBLE....But then again, such fenomena are very exotic. For example in some spin-systems (i mean many atoms and we only look at spin spin interactions) absolute NEGATIVE temperatures can arise. These temperatures are no really negative, but they need to be looked at as bigger then infinity....

    The conditions for this to occur are for example that the spin-spin relaxation time is little compared to the spin lattice relaxation time. This means that the spins mutually interact long before thermal degrees of freedom come into play. KEEP IN MIND THAT WE ARE NOT TALKING ABOUT THERMAL DEGREES OF FREEDOM HERE !!!



    regards
    marlon
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2006
  15. Dec 25, 2006 #14

    Mk

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    I completely do not understand negative temperature. Can someone explain it to me?
     
  16. Dec 25, 2006 #15

    disregardthat

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    Here's a good explanation: It does not exist, at least not in common sense.
     
  17. Dec 26, 2006 #16

    russ_watters

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    If you do, please fix the grammar - "sentences" should be singular. :grumpy:
     
  18. Dec 26, 2006 #17
    Would this be similar to total hypothermia? :confused:
     
  19. Dec 26, 2006 #18
    isn't it-theoreticaly- impossible to get to 0 K anywhere in the universe? I know we have gotten pretty close to 0K with liquid He and partical KE is reduced with some odd observations>
     
  20. Dec 26, 2006 #19

    I am not sure if it is impossible to get to 0 K but I know it is impossible to measure 0 K because the act of measurement will intefere with the system and raise its temperture in one way or another.
     
  21. Dec 26, 2006 #20

    disregardthat

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    How ironic! It is at least extremely hard to achieve 0 K, because we are always surrounded by energy at all times. At least that's what i think the reason is.
     
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