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Good statistics book?

  1. Feb 2, 2004 #1

    Monique

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    Does anyone have a good statistics book standing on the shelve? Does it deal with Chi2 tests, student tests, bonferroni corrections etc? Z scores, TDTs?

    It is so hard to get - and keep - a grip on these types of necessary components of conducting research. I'd really like to have a book which can be used as a reference..
     
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  3. Feb 2, 2004 #2

    Monique

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    Actually basically I am looking for a review book more than a statistical rigor book..
     
  4. Feb 2, 2004 #3
    Does your college not have a basic level statistic book. That will be all you need for research purposes and they usually make stats very easily understood.

    Nautica
     
  5. Feb 2, 2004 #4

    Monique

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    University I had a statistics course in college where we had to make our own models in Excel and use those to solve problems where different data groups were compared, I actually attained a full score (100%) on that test.

    The book was statistics for analytical chemistry and deals w/ 95-99% confidence intervals, judging the precision and accuracy of measurements, calculating the significance between the averages of two independant studies, anova, cusum, shall I go on? Student T tests, something with F tests..

    But this is all very long ago.. all my models are still on floppy disk!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! can you imagine? We didn't have zips or cds yet.. at least it wasn't one of those huge square thin black floppy drive things I've actually got a few hundered workable ones together with a commodore 64 computer lol

    Back to the subject.. somehow I feel this book is not adequate, as I mentioned the methods in the first post are not in there.. well, chisquared is in it.. I guess I should be on the lookout for a statistical genetics book or epidemiology book.
     
  6. Feb 2, 2004 #5

    NateTG

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    I'm not sure what you're looking for, but you can find lot's of usefull stuff at Mathworld (http://mathworld.wolfram.com/). Especially if you're mostly doing some kind of review.
     
  7. Feb 2, 2004 #6

    selfAdjoint

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    Schaum's Guide to statistics would have most of what you want (I once used it to pass a state statistics exam cold). Maybe not some of the special biostatistics topics.
     
  8. Feb 2, 2004 #7

    Moonbear

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    Unfortunately, all my stats books are in my office, and I'm not. I don't have any one book that has everything. I just don't know if such a thing exists. I have three stats books that together seem to cover all the basics. Oh, wait, just spotted one on the bookshelf here...that explains why I couldn't find it at the office the other day when trying to knock some sense into a stubborn post-doc :wink: This one doesn't really cover basic stats, but is really handy when designing experiments. Hicks, CR. Fundamental Concepts in the Design of Experiments, 4th ed. Saunders College Publishing, New York, 1993. For simple stats like chi-squared, I have one that's statistics for behavioral sciences (not the exact title)...it's great, written very easy to read (because I guess statisticians think psychology majors can't do math...they could be right). The third one goes into greater detail on all the types of t-tests, variance, confidence intervals, etc.

    What I have never managed to get my hands on is something that just lists all those different things in one book. My PhD mentor used to have a great text, long out of print, well-worn, and the disappearance of which would certainly be punishable by death. It had an assortment of standard parametric stats along with some nonparametric stats and easy to follow examples of how to calculate them (that text was written back when computers used punch cards, so people still hand-calculated that stuff).

    Oh, do you need theory or just need to do a chi-squared test? I think Excel has a function for chi-squared analysis. I know it will do t-tests. Or do you just want a reference on hand that you don't need at the moment?
     
  9. Feb 3, 2004 #8
    I found all of your statistics questions answered on Google. Altruism: it's everywhere you want to google.



    -Chris
     
  10. Feb 3, 2004 #9

    Monique

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    Well, I read a lot of research papers and they throw around all these statistics tests and corrections. I'd like to have a reference which lists ALL tests developed by type and gives their pros and cons.. I guess that book doesn't exist though..

    Or a book which lists all the different definitions of the same symbol, since they don't always mean the same thing.

    I will check out the titles listed though, thanks :)
     
  11. Feb 3, 2004 #10
    amazon.com has a lot of customer reviews of different stat books. Search there for something like 'statistics for biology' or 'biostatistics' I was going to buy one last year but they cost too much. I made a note of a couple of them:

    Statistical Tables
    by F. James Rohlf, Robert R. Sokal

    Biometry: The Principles and Practice of Statistics in Biological Research
    by Robert R. Sokal, F. James Rohlf

    Fundamentals of Biostatistics (with Data Disk)
    by Bernard Rosner

    Primer of Biostatistics
    by Stanton S. Glantz, Stanton A. Glantz

    Biostatistical Analysis (4th Edition)
    by Jerrold H. Zar

    Whatever book you get, how about posting a follow up to whether it's any good or not.

    for SAS try GraphPad's Prism
    http://www.graphpad.com/prism/Prism.htm
    it's a lot better than Excel and more intuitive.
     
  12. Feb 4, 2004 #11

    Monique

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    Oh great! I'll make sure to check those out..
     
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