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Graphing strong nuclear force

  1. Feb 8, 2015 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    http://www.boredofstudies.org/wiki/images/b/bb/Sci_phys_quanta_strong_force.png
    I had a question where I was given the strong nuclear force graph and asked to add the electrostatic force to the graph. It was a graph showing the forces between two protons. It was a three mark question. 1 mark is given for a shape that resembles 1/r^2. 1 mark is for making sure it stays above the x-axis. The final mark is for making sure it crosses the strong nuclear force for F less than Fmax. It is this final mark I am unclear about. What does it mean for F less than Fmax? Why does it have to cross at this particular point?

    2. Relevant equations

    None

    3. The attempt at a solution
    Read around textbooks and fully understand first two marking points.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 13, 2015 #2
    Thanks for the post! This is an automated courtesy bump. Sorry you aren't generating responses at the moment. Do you have any further information, come to any new conclusions or is it possible to reword the post?
     
  4. Feb 20, 2015 #3
    Thank you. No, I have fully outlined the question so can't add any more detail.
     
  5. Feb 20, 2015 #4

    mfb

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    Fmax could be the maximal attractive force, but I don't see why the two forces should cross below that (as absolute values). Maybe they just have to cross somewhere.
     
  6. Feb 20, 2015 #5
    Thanks. Is there any significance of the electrostatic crossing the strong nuclear? I just don't see why this is a specific marking point for that question? What would be the problem drawing the electrostatic shifted to the right so that it doesn't cross the strong nuclear force line at all?
     
  7. Feb 20, 2015 #6

    mfb

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    Staff: Mentor

    Well, it does cross it, but at that point the electromagnetic force is not an easy 1/r^2-potential any more so this simplified picture breaks down anyway.
     
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