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Gravitation and gauss' law

  1. Aug 6, 2008 #1
    hello,
    I was wondering if there is an equivalent gauss' law for gravitation like:
    [tex]\Phi[/tex]=4[tex]\pi[/tex]G*Menclosed
    any help would be appreciated. Thank you.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 6, 2008 #2

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

  4. Aug 6, 2008 #3
    thank you. but do magnetic fields have any such law? intuitively, i am inclined to say no,
    because magnetic field lines can cross.....but i would like a rigorous proof
     
  5. Aug 6, 2008 #4

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    Yes, there's a Gauss's law for magnetic fields--it's one of Maxwell's Equations. Since there are no magnetic monopoles, it is rather simple: Gauss' law for magnetism.

    Magnetic field lines can cross only where the field is zero.
     
  6. Aug 6, 2008 #5

    Defennder

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    I'm curious as to why there isn't any magnetic monopoles. The freshman physics textbook I read for my intro physics course says that current theory (I think it was Serway) does predict the existence of magnetic monopoles.
     
  7. Aug 7, 2008 #6
    No one seems to have found any magnetic monopoles. By including magnetic charge and magnetic current terms in Maxwell's equations you postulate magnetic charge. It brings some (anti-) symmetry to the equations, but this is inconsistence with the magnetic potential.
     
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