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Gravitational Forces!

  1. Sep 30, 2009 #1
    (a) Calculate the magnitude of the gravitational force exerted on a 787-kg satellite that is a distance of two earth radii from the center of the earth= 8.48*10^-14

    (b) What is the magnitude of the gravitational force exerted on the earth by the satellite? (In Newtons)

    (c) Determine the magnitude of the satellite's acceleration. (m/s^2)

    (d) What is the magnitude of the earth's acceleration (m/s^2)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 30, 2009 #2

    tiny-tim

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    Welcome to PF!

    Hi ahealy88! Welcome to PF! :wink:

    Show us what you've tried, and where you're stuck, and then we'll know how to help! :smile:
     
  4. Sep 30, 2009 #3
    Thank you! :)
    I've tried the F=G(m1m2/r^2) and F=ma and I'm not getting anywhere.
     
  5. Sep 30, 2009 #4

    tiny-tim

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    (try using the X2 and X2 tags just above the Reply box :wink:)

    Well, have you done a) then?

    If not, show us your calculations, so that we can see what's going wrong. :smile:
     
  6. Sep 30, 2009 #5
    The answer to A was given to me, its 8.48*10-14
     
  7. Sep 30, 2009 #6
    I don't know how to get A; I'm completely lost in this problem.
     
  8. Sep 30, 2009 #7

    tiny-tim

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    You know g, the gravitational acceleration at one Earth radius …

    so what is the gravitational acceleration at two Earth radii? :smile:

    (and then use F = ma)
     
  9. Sep 30, 2009 #8
    that did not help.

    what i have is the mass of earth=5.9742*10^24
    G= 6.674*10^11

    my equation did not add up= 6.674*10^11(5.9742*10^24 * 787 / 12756.2^2)
     
  10. Sep 30, 2009 #9
    and i have no idea how to figure out b,c, & d
     
  11. Sep 30, 2009 #10
  12. Oct 1, 2009 #11

    tiny-tim

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    You don't need the mass of the Earth! :rolleyes:

    You know g, the gravitational acceleration at one Earth radius …

    so what is the gravitational acceleration at two Earth radii? :smile:
     
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