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Gravitational pull question

  1. May 23, 2007 #1
    shouldn't an object that is being push away from earth with the same force accelerate as it goes up in elevation, also would not temperature have an affect on the object gravitational pull
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 23, 2007 #2

    cristo

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    Any object that has a constant force F applied to it will experience an acceleration a due to Newton's second law: F=ma.
    Do you mean the acceleration the object would feel due to gravity? If so, the temperature will affect the acceleration of an object due to gravity if it affects the mass of the object.
     
  4. May 23, 2007 #3
    yes but whould 2 objects of the same mass but dif temps have dif gravitational pulls?
     
  5. May 23, 2007 #4

    cristo

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    The gravitational force between two bodies is [tex]F=\frac{GmM}{r^2}[/tex]. Since this does not depend upon temperature, then the answer to your question is no.
     
  6. May 23, 2007 #5
    so the force of the suns temp has nothing to do with it gravitational pull on us? i am going to look into this and try to find out something, my question is if the sun put out no heat would we still be in the same obit, or would everything change, because if temp had nothing to do with it, it would not matter
     
  7. May 23, 2007 #6
    What do you mean by force of the sun's temperature?
    If the sun stopped burning, it would collapse under its own gravitational forces, if that is what you were asking.
     
  8. May 23, 2007 #7

    cristo

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    This makes no sense, as there is no such thing as a force due to temperature.
    But if the temperature of a star changes, then the mass of the star will change. Furthermore, if a star stopped radiating, then it would cease to be a star (and I suppose would collapse, since there will be no gravitational force in the star!)
     
  9. May 23, 2007 #8
    i know thesun would, but lets say al the suns heat was blocked from the earth, would our orbit change or not, and we have not proven that temp is not a force, a warm wind blows faster than a cold wind does it not, things that are warmer have more energy so how could that not be a force
     
  10. May 23, 2007 #9

    cristo

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    Well it wholly depends on whats blocking the sunlight doesn't it!

    To be honest, I don't like the way this thread is going. The fact that the OP does not actually ask the question that you were wanting answered, but in fact is designed to draw someone into replying to a seemingly innocent question, tends to hint to me that this is going down the crackpot route. Therefore, I shall bow out now.
     
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