1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

I Gravity along ecliptic

  1. Jan 11, 2017 #1
    I am curious to know if the gravitic field of a rotating, disk-shaped mass is denser along its ecliptic. I'm referring to rotating bodies such as stellar systems, galaxies, etc. I would like to know if a second mass, passing through the ecliptic, would experience a difference such as tidal forces or perturbations. Basically, does a massive disk have any difference in its gravitic pull axially vs radially? From a great distance, it would just be a point-source, but up close I'm thinking that the magnitude of the vectors of individual bodies comprising the whole would be less axially than radially.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 11, 2017 #2

    mfb

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    The gravitational field of a disk is different from the field of a sphere. For a disk of uniform mass, this website has some plots of the gravitational potential. The force is orthogonal to the equipotential lines and stronger where the lines are denser.
     
  4. Jan 12, 2017 #3
    From what I can interpret, the graph I would be using would be 'rotating w/star.' The field is densest at the center because of law of squares, and weakest horizontally from the center. It shows another dense region outside the disk radially. So, yes?
     
  5. Jan 12, 2017 #4

    mfb

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    The page doesn't load right now, but as far as I remember the "rotating" probably included effective potentials for orbiting bodies. I'm not sure if you want that.

    If the disk has a cylindrical symmetry, its rotation does not matter for the gravitational potential (ignoring relativistic effects).

    Edit: Looks like relativistic effects are considered. Do you really want that?
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: Gravity along ecliptic
  1. Ecliptic tilt (Replies: 0)

Loading...