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Gravity and Helium

  1. Dec 16, 2004 #1

    DB

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    If gravity aplies the same force on every object, accellerating it to about 10 m/s2 (gee), then how come for example helium floats up to the sky?

    Thnx
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 16, 2004 #2

    ZapperZ

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    Hint: the helium balloon will NOT float up the sky if it is in a vacuum, or very thin air.

    Zz.
     
  4. Dec 16, 2004 #3

    HallsofIvy

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    Because it is "in the sky"- in other words, in air that has a higher density than helium has. The air is attracted by a greater force than the helium is (gravitational force is proportional to the mass) and "pushes" the helium up.
     
  5. Dec 16, 2004 #4

    Gokul43201

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    Hope this isn't too many cooks...

    Try this : If gravity applies the same force on every object, accellerating it to about 10 m/s2 (gee), then how come for example wood floats up to the top of a lake ?

    NOTE : Gravity does not apply the same force on all objects, it creates the same field (at some height)...but that's not important here.
     
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