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Gravity / LHC

  1. Jan 5, 2008 #1
    Does any one know if the LHC could detect the graviton thx
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 6, 2008 #2

    Wallace

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    From my understanding of the LHC there is no expectation to find a graviton particle, since there is no solid basis for the existence of such a particle and no knowledge of what kind of mass it might have if it exists. Of course a good proportion of the particles that have been found already were found unexpectedly and the LHC will probe regions of the particle parameter space previously unseen so there is always the possibility that something like this might turn up.
     
  4. Jan 6, 2008 #3
    Thank you wallace I can't wait to see what they will find.
     
  5. Jan 6, 2008 #4

    Wallace

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    I'm sure you're not alone there!
     
  6. Jan 7, 2008 #5

    wolram

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    I may be wrong, but surly gravitons would be very sparse, what would be the chances of capturing one?
     
  7. Jan 7, 2008 #6

    wolram

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    Found this,

    4) calculate graviton density constant d

    d=E^2/Gh^2
    8.2089591 x 10^95 kg/m^3 = (2.4048041 x 10^19 kg^2-m^4/s^4)/
    (6.6723641 x 10^-11 m^3/kg-s^2)(4.3904787 x 10^-67 kg^2-m^4/s^2)
    8.2089591 x 10^95 kg/m^3 = 8.2089591 x 10^95 kg/m^3
    [rsu 3.9 x 10^-8]

    I have no idea.
     
  8. Jan 8, 2008 #7
    8.2089591 x 10^95 kg/m^3

    wow that's dense, or do you mean 8.2089591 x 10 (to the minus) 95 kg/m3
     
  9. Jan 8, 2008 #8

    wolram

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    That was why i said i have no idea, i am sure you are right, as i am sure gravitons would be (relatively) sparse.
     
  10. Jan 8, 2008 #9

    wolram

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    Is the quantity of gravitons increasing, well if you think about it every gravitational inter action must produce gravitons, and in the final analysis there will only be gravitons, and as
    gravity gravitates________________.

    There would be no way for any thing to bounce, it would be the end.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2008
  11. Jan 8, 2008 #10
    Here there is an article about some researches about gravitomagnetism that could bring some light to the issue of the graviton and his mass.

    http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg19225771.800

     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2008
  12. Jan 9, 2008 #11

    wolram

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    Photons develop mass??
     
  13. Jan 9, 2008 #12
    it seems more as science fiction, it is extremly weird and heretical, but it is just an hypotesis if proven true (which is very unlikely) the standar model would have to be rewriten.

     
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