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Gravity < Planck Mass

  1. Sep 25, 2013 #1
    Is there any experimental or observational evidence that conclusively shows gravitational forces acting on mass that is less than the Planck mass? thx
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 25, 2013 #2

    Vanadium 50

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    Does a grain of fine sand fall? Then you have your answer.
     
  4. Sep 25, 2013 #3
    I should have been more explicit. I'm looking for verifiable info. on the limits of gravitational testability on a small scale. thx
     
  5. Sep 26, 2013 #4

    Vanadium 50

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    I say again, does a grain of fine sand fall? Why does this not count as gravitational testability?
     
  6. Sep 26, 2013 #5
    It most certainly does. As I said, less than the Planck mass. Let's keep dividing that grain of sand by 2. Looking for a comprehensive list of experimental data that shows the experimental limit. thx
     
  7. Sep 26, 2013 #6
  8. Sep 26, 2013 #7
    I don't get it. Are you saying that experiments haven't been carried out? And that there is not a limit to the experiments where we can verify in a lab a gravitational attraction? Doesn't sound crackpot to me. Just looking for the data.
     
  9. Sep 26, 2013 #8
    Here's a good paper showing a Gaussian distribution on Si with a length order of magnitude 10 minus 12. Looking for hard experimental data.

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1210.0457v3.pdf
     
  10. Sep 26, 2013 #9

    Bill_K

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    No need to make it smaller. The Planck mass is 22 micrograms, so such a grain of sand would be about a tenth of a millimeter across, easily visible to the naked eye.
     
  11. Sep 26, 2013 #10

    ZapperZ

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    I don't get this either. Don't we already have neutron-drop experiments? Isn't this smaller than 22 micrograms?

    Zz.
     
  12. Sep 26, 2013 #11
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