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Gravity wave

  1. May 30, 2010 #1
    Are gravity waves rare?
    I don't I've ever seen them so any help will be good, thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 30, 2010 #2

    tiny-tim

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    Hi Awsom Guy! :smile:

    If gravity waves exist, they're extremely common (they're produced whenever anything changes shape), but they're also extremely weak, and extremely difficult to detect. :wink:
    No, gravity waves have nothing to do with the atmosphere, they come from extremely distant sources

    (and they don't affect the atmosphere … any bad weather you're experiencing is entirely the fault of the government :wink:)
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2010
  4. May 31, 2010 #3
    I quote from wikipedia "In the Earth's atmosphere, gravity waves are important for transferring momentum from the troposphere to the stratosphere". Are you sure they have nothing to do with atmosphere. Thanks for any help.
     
  5. May 31, 2010 #4

    tiny-tim

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    oh, i thought you mean gravitational waves …

    i've never heard of those "gravity waves" before …

    whyever are they called that? :confused:
     
  6. May 31, 2010 #5
    Thats ok, is you above statement wrong "If gravity waves exist, they're extremely common (they're produced whenever anything changes shape), but they're also extremely weak, and extremely difficult to detect". Yes a lot of people get themselves confused with gravitational and gravity waves, and I think so does google. :O
     
  7. May 31, 2010 #6
    They are called that because they are just like ripples in water. but gravity in gravity waves confuses everyone as it does not have much to do with gravity waves :D
     
  8. May 31, 2010 #7
    Thanks for trying.
     
  9. Jun 1, 2010 #8
    The waves you see on the surface of any body of water are "gravity waves". They are called that because gravity wants to make the surface flat, so a disturbance propagates as the falling peak just builds up water somewhere else.

    Don't confuse "gravity wave" with "gravitational wave". The latter is what makes binary neutron stars spiral together.

    Another thing people get confused about is "holograph" with "hologram". A museum might have a 200 year old holograph on display, but it has nothing to do with lasers <g>.
     
  10. Jun 3, 2010 #9
    oh wow, thanks for the information on holographs. I thought they were the same thing. damn. Thanks heaps.
     
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