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GRE and scholarship

  • Thread starter hagopbul
  • Start date
  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

hello all

i have a Q

i got a 90% in the GRE physics would i be eligible for a scholarship for master degree

PS : i got C in university
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Vanadium 50
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Eligible? Certainly. Likely? That's more difficult to say. Two things work against you - scholarships and assistantships for terminal masters degrees are rare, and your grades are quite poor: poor enough that it may prove hard to be accepted at all.
 
  • #3
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but i have a GRE 90% do you know how much it is hard to have a 90% in GRE physics so why it is so hard to have a scholarship
normal people have a 50% in best case 75% i got 90%
 
  • #4
39
0
sure. you will get scholarship. but it its depend on your GPA ,GRE general score and other qualification.

you know that, my scores are like below
GRE general-verbal 310 quantitative 740

GRE physics 41%
TOEFL- 85 ibt
GPA-3.79 in 4.00 scale.

with those score i got 5 financial offers from
uni of tennessee-koxvil
uni of south carolina
ohio university
uni of connecticut and uni of arkansas.


however I accepted the offer of ohio university.
 
  • #5
Vanadium 50
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Education Advisor
2019 Award
23,858
6,305
but i have a GRE 90% do you know how much it is hard to have a 90% in GRE physics
Yes, I do. I'd bet that about 10% of the GRE participants score better than that. That would be about 400 people.

so why it is so hard to have a scholarship
normal people have a 50% in best case 75% i got 90%
And that entitles you to someone else's money exactly how?

A C is failing in graduate school. A C average is equivalent to an F average. You need to recognize how low this is in comparison to other people who want assistanceships - and admission. A question that you will need to be prepared to answer is "were you unable to get better grades? Or did you just choose to?"

I stand by my original statement: Two things work against you - scholarships and assistantships for terminal masters degrees are rare, and your grades are quite poor: poor enough that it may prove hard to be accepted at all.
 
Last edited:
  • #6
I stand by my original statement: Two things work against you - scholarships and assistantships for terminal masters degrees are rare, and your grades are quite poor: poor enough that it may prove hard to be accepted at all.
I'll second this statement. Offers are based on a variety of factors that show performance across the board. While your high GRE is one measure of performance and ability, your low GPA indicates perhaps a lack of focus -- an unwillingness to "stick it through" the course of a term (let alone a degree program -- and your pursuit of a MS, rather than a PhD, is perhaps also indicative of this.)

Also -- generally, in the sciences and engineering, students must find their own funding for Master's degrees... either through their workplace, or through some means such as military funding (with commitment to the military for some duration of time -- tho' this could, at my time, be done as a civilian, not necessarily as an enlisted soldier, through a program known at the time as the "Palace Knight" program). One field where I've seen in exception is if a physics student decides to pursue an M.Ed. -- or a master's in teaching, becoming certified to teach middle or high school science in the process. This is because of national incentives to increase the number of qualified science teachers in the high school.

Graduate funding is otherwise usually reserved for the students that intend to complete Ph.D. programs... that way the school gets the most "bang for their buck" by investing in a student who will be there for a longer period of time (and later be funded through research grants). The one exception, perhaps, is to get some form of funding from a school that does not offer Ph.D.'s... and perhaps offers financial incentive through some form of TA.

While you may disagree with the situation as presented to you, it is the dominate situation in the field. It's doubtful that you'll receive much special treatment for one test score, albeit above average.
 
  • #7
224
9
thanx i understand now thank you a lot for your help

and for the "were you unable to get better grades? Or did you just choose to?"

i was working as a teacher of physics in a school in a remote area in the same time of my study so it was so hard on me to finish the courses some time i have to conclude some of the theoretical information my self at the exam

but thanx for your answer it was a great help
 
  • #8
224
9
I'll second this statement. Offers are based on a variety of factors that show performance across the board. While your high GRE is one measure of performance and ability, your low GPA indicates perhaps a lack of focus -- an unwillingness to "stick it through" the course of a term (let alone a degree program -- and your pursuit of a MS, rather than a PhD, is perhaps also indicative of this.)

Also -- generally, in the sciences and engineering, students must find their own funding for Master's degrees... either through their workplace, or through some means such as military funding (with commitment to the military for some duration of time -- tho' this could, at my time, be done as a civilian, not necessarily as an enlisted soldier, through a program known at the time as the "Palace Knight" program). One field where I've seen in exception is if a physics student decides to pursue an M.Ed. -- or a master's in teaching, becoming certified to teach middle or high school science in the process. This is because of national incentives to increase the number of qualified science teachers in the high school.

Graduate funding is otherwise usually reserved for the students that intend to complete Ph.D. programs... that way the school gets the most "bang for their buck" by investing in a student who will be there for a longer period of time (and later be funded through research grants). The one exception, perhaps, is to get some form of funding from a school that does not offer Ph.D.'s... and perhaps offers financial incentive through some form of TA.

While you may disagree with the situation as presented to you, it is the dominate situation in the field. It's doubtful that you'll receive much special treatment for one test score, albeit above average.
so you recommend a PhD that i go after a PhD

in the same time i was thinking that the way to enter a PhD is to Go through Ms degree
 
  • #9
3
0
What was your university ?

I have found you insult yourself right in your post for the reason I don't know as to why you should make a question like that.
even when you don't go through master to phd, you still need to spend 5 years to get the degree, as far as i know.
 
  • #10
j93
191
2
Are you an international student? It sounds like it,If so probably not because 90% is almost dime a dozen for foreigners. If youre domestic than it probably is very possible to get funding for a PhD program that is not in the top 70 because if you matriculate you would boost the programs published average PGRE which alot of programs do publish unlike GPA which creates a sort of incentive for programs to put a fair amount of weight on PGRE.
 
  • #11
21
0
so you recommend a PhD that i go after a PhD

in the same time i was thinking that the way to enter a PhD is to Go through Ms degree
In the US you generally don't have to get a Masters Degree; instead, you usually go directly from a Bachelors to a Ph.D.
 

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