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Engineering Great Cities for engineering

  1. May 3, 2010 #1
    Hi

    I am currently in NYC and upon completion of my degree I wanted to relocate to where engineering jobs are more plentiful. NY seems great for civil but that is primarily it. I am very interested in nuclear and power engineering in general but I would prefer working for some sort of consulting engineering firm. What are some citites where firms such as these are concentrated.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 4, 2010 #2
    If you are interested in getting into nuclear and power engineering, I would suggest looking into relocating to West Virginia. Most government contract jobs that deal with nuclear research are in that area. As far as working for a consulting firm, you are going to find some difficulty finding a job working at a consulting firm if you are not able to pass the Fundamentals of Engineering exam. If you are not on track toward obtaining a professional license, some consulting firms won't consider you.
     
  4. May 10, 2010 #3
    over 200 views and only one suggestion for West Virginia, i know we have some more knowledge on the boards than that.

    Hows San Diego. I am interested in other things besides nuclear just want to settle someplace where I will not have to move again for sometime..
     
  5. May 10, 2010 #4
    The only one that comes to mind is Oak Ridge in Tennessee. But it's just the Oak Ridge Lab in that area that I know of. I don't think there is much to this area in terms of concentrated work. It's not like computer engineering/science in silicon valley type of deal.
     
  6. May 17, 2010 #5
    Alternatively, you could look into BAE systems in / around Silver Springs, Maryland. They work with nuclear powered submarines and ships, as well as the navy.
     
  7. May 19, 2010 #6
    Good thing you mentioned the Navy. The US Navy has many nuclear reactors on submarines, carriers, etc. There are many places where you can work on nukes for the Navy (if not on a ship,) for example San Diego has a pretty big naval base operating there. I have a cousin who got his degree, joined the Navy nukes program, was assigned to a submarine, and then left the Navy after the service to become successful in private sector engineering. It definitely opens up some options if you don't mind being in the military to work on your nuclear energy.

    If not, then San Diego (because you mentioned it earlier) also has the San Onofre Station nearby, just off the 5 freeway. It's not a new power plant, so the availability of positions might pale in comparison to the new plants around the US that are being planned and contracted right now as part of the new energy policy.
     
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