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Greeks Vs. Pythagoras

  1. Oct 25, 2009 #1
    I understand the greek theory of the universe (Sphere's within sphere's within sphere's) but other than the fact the universe is based on mathematics, is there any other variations in the belief of the universe from the pythagoras?
     
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  3. Oct 26, 2009 #2

    Redbelly98

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    Thread moved to General Discussion forum - does not pertain to our current understanding of science, math, or technology.
     
  4. Oct 26, 2009 #3
    Not trying to come off wrong but it's intro to physics. Has to do with the introduction to out solar system and how we came about finding the distance and size's of the sun and moon which lead to the findinf og gravitational pull.

    The book it's out of is Physics : Concepts and Connections
     
  5. Oct 26, 2009 #4

    Kurdt

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    I'm not entirely sure what you're asking. Other greek philosophers and scientists tried to improve on the Pythagorean model (which failed to explain retrograde motions of the planets). The Greeks were preoccupied with notions of mathematical aesthetics however which hindered their progression.
     
  6. Oct 27, 2009 #5

    Redbelly98

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    If this is the question:

    then I'd answer yes, there are many variations between what we believe now and the view Phythagoras! For one, Pythagoras had the Earth as a perfect sphere, located at the center of the universe.

    The Pythagoras view is described in a little more detail at this site:
    http://sacred-texts.com/earth/boe/boe20.htm
    Scroll almost halfway down the page, or just search the page for "pythag". If you read the description there, you can compare/contrast it to what we know about the solar system and universe today.
     
  7. Oct 27, 2009 #6

    Pythagorean

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    Hail to the spider, irrational numbers don't exist! Oh wait, Pythagorean theorem, yes they do, damn. But you should still abstain from beans.
     
  8. Oct 27, 2009 #7

    DavidSnider

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    "1.414213562373... 0950488 .. 016887242097... *sigh* screw it! You're going overboard!"
     
  9. Oct 27, 2009 #8
    Kepler tried for years to find a correspondence between the orbits of the planets and the "perfect" solids (cube = 6 squares , tetrahedron = 4 equilateral trianges, dodecahedron = 12 pentagons, etc.) I wonder if there are any original sources available.
     
  10. Oct 27, 2009 #9

    Kurdt

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    I'm not aware of any original sources but it is documented that Kepler's early attempts at explaining the ratios between planetary orbits involved the use of platonic solids built around he orbital shells.
     
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