Green Bags®

  1. Ivan Seeking

    Ivan Seeking 12,521
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    https://www.greenbags.com/?cid=402572

    On face of things this claim sounds reasonable to me, but really I have no idea.

    They claim to be good for ten uses.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Greg Bernhardt

    Staff: Admin

    oh yes my mom uses these! She claims they work, but I don't know. The product claims it works by absorbing gases emitted by the fruit. So how would that help bananas that get left out in the open?
     
  4. Ivan Seeking

    Ivan Seeking 12,521
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    According to this:

    http://www.ehow.com/how_2196971_slow-rotting-fruits-vegetables.html

    and according to the Green Bag site
    A Google for Zeolite immediately pops up with this
    http://www.zeolite.com/

    which I thought was interesting.

    Under Zeolites we get this from wiki
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zeolite

    So at this point the original claim sounds plausible, but we need some better sources and more specifics.
     
  5. Moonbear

    Moonbear 12,266
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    I don't know about you guys, but when a woman gets flowers, she doesn't exactly want to stuff them into a bag to keep them fresh. :uhh:

    Watching the ad, what do they consider "traditional" storage? She's showing a rather rotten looking head of iceberg lettuce, claiming it was just 8 days of storage. I've NEVER seen iceberg lettuce turn that nasty in such short time. Same for carrots...I'd have to leave them sitting on the counter at room temperature to get that nasty that fast. They look like they've been dehydrated. The carrots didn't have lots of fuzzy root hairs growing out of them, which is the effect of ethylene on roots (roots don't ripen, fruits do), so ethylene isn't the culprit there. And I don't know of any effect of ethylene on lettuce LEAVES. Again, lettuce doesn't have a ripening process.

    She claims the strawberries were PURCHASED the same date, but doesn't say how long after the purchase she's comparing them, or their condition at the time of purchase. If I buy one box of fairly green strawberries and one of overly ripe ones with a moldy one already in the bottom of it (yes, if you don't look carefully, you will get moldy strawberries straight from the store), the overripe ones will look like that in a couple days while the green ones will just be ripening up nicely for eating.

    Here's a nice article on ethylene, including a historical account of how it was originally identified as a ripening agent.
    http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?pid=S1415-47572006000300020&script=sci_arttext
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2008
  6. Greg Bernhardt

    Staff: Admin

    good points MB, sales tactics are tricky!
     
  7. Green bags

    I saw this on TV a few nights ago, and I wasn't sure what to make of it. Then came the thread in GD about wasting food. Has anyone tried these?

    https://www.greenbags.com/?page=index

    Edit by Ivan: Post merged with existing thread.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 15, 2008
  8. LowlyPion

    LowlyPion 5,337
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    What about the other color bags?

    "What is the difference in the different color DEBBIE MEYER™ Green Bags®?
    The different colors have a different effect on different foods. The colors are as follows:

    Green – Fruit/Vegetables
    Yellow – Breads and grains
    Red – meats
    Blue – Cheese"


    They have Zeolite bags for Meat?

    No thanks. I'm thinking 10 times longer doesn't apply to meat that I would want to eat.
     
  9. I have ordered these bags and found they don't work as advertised. I was very disappointed in the product. I should have known that this just a way for someone to make money by fooling the public. I would not recommend anyone ordering these bags, they will be throwing their money away.
     
  10. Zeolite impregnated plastic?! Somehow I am doubtful, very doubtful.

    Bananas may emit some ethylene during ripening, but they are also purposely exposed to ethylene to ripen them. Once I bought unripe bananas from Stop&Shop that were extra green....a week later they were still green and downright hard - inedible. I was a bit perplexed. Next store visit, I asked the produce guy about it. He said they had gotten a batch that had missed the ethylene treatment. I was unaware of this, but apparently, bananas that are unexposed or improperly exposed to ethylene never ripen properly.

    Putzing around on Google, I see several hits referring to ethylene as a "plant hormone"....errr, as a chemist, I've never heard of a low molecular weight gas being called a hormone but perhaps it's kosher in food producers' parlance.

    In any case, marketing aside, I have zero Faith that "green bags" are worth even a nickel.

    A beer a day keeps the doctor happy.
     
  11. Moonbear

    Moonbear 12,266
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    Try picking up a biology textbook. It's perfectly correct to call ethylene a plant hormone.
     
  12. Okay then - for a biologist I suppose! But as a chemist and in my mind's eye, "real" hormones are much more complex molecules with long, intricate syntheses, at least a ring and maybe a chiral carbon or two.....ethylene?! pffft :tongue:

    Since the Green Bags® are for use with food and the FDA cannot give a GRAS approval to a product on testimonials alone, you would think there must have been a bevy of food safety tests that needed to be performed before any marketing. For one thing, zeolite ingestion could well be unhealthy. I would really like to know more about their manufacture and the some of the basic research that the product grew from, including safety checks. I'm looking.
     
  13. LowlyPion

    LowlyPion 5,337
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    First I'd say that you have to first demonstrate that the zeolite - claimed to be impregnated in the plastic - is adhering to the food in any way for it to qualify in some way as an additive.

    But that said, as to zeolite toxicology, I see numerous promo-sites touting liquid zeolite colloidal suspensions, suitable they claim, for chelating heavy metals and other toxins from the body. Now that I suppose is directly under the purview of the FDA and I'm not seeing any contraindications to its use.
     
  14. GCT

    GCT 1,769
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    I just went to Walmart the produce section has green bags...wonder if it's the same thing.
     
  15. Greg Bernhardt

    Staff: Admin

    yeah I noticed Trader Joes produce is wrapped in colored bags now too.
     
  16. GCT

    GCT 1,769
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  17. Moonbear

    Moonbear 12,266
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    Size or complexity has nothing to do with something being a hormone. It has to do with how it signals a cell to have a function.

    A lot of grocery stores have green bags in their produce sections, and have for a while. Since it's mostly around the leafy green vegetables section, I suspect they are primarily meant to keep you from noticing how not-so-green the produce is before you get it home. You may or may not have noticed that the lighting is also slightly different around the produce cases...everything there looks just a bit greener than it does if you take it a bit out of the produce section to look at it (sometimes you just need to take a step back from the case when it's only illuminating the refrigeration cases). I don't know if they're really the same thing, or just tinted green by some other process.
     
  18. Ivan Seeking

    Ivan Seeking 12,521
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    Last night I noticed that my mother-in-law is using Green Bags. She tried a side-by-side test using lettuce, which the Green Bags passed with flying colors.
     
  19. baywax

    baywax 2,215
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    Then you haven't tried canned moose. That'll stay on the shelf for years and still provide the best meal you've ever had... if you eat moose. Yah yah... shades of Sarah Palin.... :rolleyes:
     
  20. this is one of those things I don't understand. produce doesn't last in my house for more than a week, not because it spoils but because we consume it. we go to the local growers co-op to restock. it's cheap and fresh. I also live in the socal so it's not a farm community by any stretch.

    As to keeping them, the herbs sit on the counter in lowballs with water and for the lettuce I'll bag it and fill the bag with CO2, where do I get the CO2? simple fill it like a balloon when you exhale. that keeps it longer than anything I found for free, since I consume veggies daily it gets re-filled daily.

    I guess I don't get the point of wasting produce by buying more than you can consume before it spoils, it's not like it's not going to be at the store next week.
     
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