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Green Functions

  1. Dec 27, 2007 #1
    Not sure if this is the best place, but it's also my first post, so meta-answers about where I'm supposed to put this business are welcome too.

    I'm a physics student, and I'm interested in learning about Green functions, but I sold back the Boas book that I used for my math methods class (we didn't cover the topic), and that's about the level that I'm looking for; is there a free resource that explains the method in a way that I don't need a huge knowledge of integral equations and functional analysis to comprehend, or at the other end, a book that brings all those topics together so that a physicist can understand it?

    Thanks,
    Will
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 5, 2008 #2
    No help?
     
  4. Jan 6, 2008 #3

    CompuChip

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    You could try Wikipedia to begin with, including the external links and book references at the bottom.

    Furthermore, a search on Google returns this book which looks promising to me, but I don't know if it is what you want.

    You could also go to your library and see what they have on the subject, then you can hold the book and look inside it.
     
  5. Jan 6, 2008 #4
    Well, I've done all that, but everything I've come to is either at a graduate level, or advanced undergrad, but for math majors. The Roach book is probably the best on the subject for undergrads, from what I've seen, but it put me to sleep. =(
     
  6. Jan 6, 2008 #5

    Dr Transport

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