GTA: San Andreas and psychological consequences

  1. Pengwuino

    Pengwuino 7,118
    Gold Member

    So i got San Andreas, the newest game in the Grand Theft auto series and i was wondering something. A lot of people thought the first 2 grand theft auto 3 series games have provoked a lot of violence in the youth culture because they are mimicking the game. This latest game has one feature where you rob people's houses! Now, if i was some impressionable kid, I'd think that this would be something I could do very easily! Anyone think this will have any adverse effects on the minds of kids or young teens?

    For some reason this is, for some reason, something that raises some flags in my mind. Anyone else thinking like i am? :)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. if video games affected behavior, then we'd be running from ghosts in dark rooms while eating yellow pills. OMG, ur right!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  4. uhh lol thats a funny eg yourdad...but there is a difference between reality and imagination in a virtual environment and i'm sure kids can tell the difference.

    and if kids are playing san andreas there parents should be beat over the head.
     
  5. If a kid isn't aware of the consequences for taking such actions, then yes, he can pretend to take on a role of a thief that breaks into people's houses. The kid is just playing. Every kid has to learn his/her limitations and other things, and that's partially done by pretending to be different people or things and trying them out. But the fear, "OMG! he's gonna grow up to be a thief," or something like that is preposterous. Kids tend to explore the world they live in, and to no suprise, they get themselves in trouble.
     
  6. Monique

    Monique 4,699
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Right, you think so? It shifts boundaries of what is acceptible. My boyfriend is playing it right now (quite addicted he is) and I sometimes come and sit next to him and watch peoples brains blown out, it is sick. How shocked will the kids be when they see a real person's head taken off, are they conditioned to see it as virtual reality?

    I can't help but cringe everytime a woman is beaten and thrown out of the car, or stomped to death. Do the kids have the same emotion? I doubt it.
     
  7. for me this is kind of a tough question because i have played violent video games for as long as i can remember and i dont do the things i do in this virtual world (besides applying experiences in shooter games to playing paintball). however, some people who already have dificulty distinguishing between whats real and whats imaginary might be empowered by these video game experiences.

    parents with children who Do have problems with reality vs. imaginary should be sensoring matierals they view. its the same idea as taking a 10 year old to see a horror movie in a theater in that the fault is almost entirly on the parents IMO
     
  8. Pengwuino

    Pengwuino 7,118
    Gold Member

    Well i was basing this thread off of how "they" say that children can lose sight of the line between reality and virtual reality in video games and movies and such. Didnt they say the guys at columbine were mimicking The Matrix?
     
  9. Last I remembered, I believe they said that the columbine guys were more influenced by the archaic computer game Doom (whose third generation counterpart is out on the markets now), the precursor to all modern computer first person shooters. Though the Matrix allusion would make sense with the long trenchcoats and all.
     
  10. monique i think misinterpreted my post..it was a response to the post above it where yourdad mentions then why aren't kids running aroudn chasing ghosts.

    in VR a child can tell the difference between what is fake and what is reality in terms of perception not consequences....for example take the 8-10 year kid who hung a 2-3 year old on a coat hangar...because he/she saw it in caspar...the ghost isn't the one being hanged on the coat hangar it was a child...now i mean if a ghost was to be hanged on the coat hangar...i dont' think the child would go out and find a ghost...
    but to the child...hanging a kid on a coat hangar is the reality regardless of the consequences. Now video games are addicting...especially FPS...and i have the urge to join the army just to use a gun...so games where the individual can portray the reality are dangerous...however playign a game like starcraft or natural selection or avp...well you can't really go killing aliens in reallife
     
  11. Monique

    Monique 4,699
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    From a CBS article on a boy who commited a violent crime after being a car theft suspect:
    http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/06/17/60minutes/main702599.shtml
     
  12. Monique that article: shows that GTA is one of the games that is a real perception of our reality...its not like stealing a spaceship in some games.
    or doing jedi mind tricks...or being a predator and jumping off high buildings to hunt down aliens.

    And in those types of cases you can only blame the parents/guardians for not supervising what the boy can play. And its not like he can't get the same training from a movie or the army.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2005
  13. That was wolfenstein, actually.
     
  14. It's not clear to me that whenever a game is cited as an influence for a violent crime that it is anything more than speculation, bad use of psychology, or simply an excuse. But I think we can pretty much agree that it's best for young children not to be exposed to this sort of stuff.
     
  15. Monique

    Monique 4,699
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    The topic of discussion is GTA, not spaceships.
     
  16. Ivan Seeking

    Ivan Seeking 12,538
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    That's why video games are so effective as training tools for soldiers and police personnel.
     
  17. brewnog

    brewnog 2,791
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    No matter how many violent, realistic computer games a kid plays at a young age, if he's been brought up properly then he knows the difference between reality and fantasy, and knows that going out onto the street and kicking grannies is wrong.

    These kids who go out shooting people know exactly what they're doing. By all means, express doubt over the quality of their upbringing, but singling out computer games as a direct cause of their actions is just silly sensationalism.

    I've played GTA quite a bit, and I'll say that it's a fun game. It's addictive, it's violent, and it's often pretty gory. The 'missions' on the game are inherently, and morally outrageous. But it's a game, and never once have I felt the need to go and kick a prostitute, rob a shop, or procure a load of hand grenades and start a violent escapade involving the police, FBI, and army. In the game, the consequences are (usually) "Game Over", and you start again, whatever. It's blatently obvious to even the most deluded juvenile delinquent that in real life, there are consequences of such actions.


    A lot of the kids who are allowed to play 18 certificate games at the age of 5 are allowed to do so because their parents don't give a damn. The same parents are unlikely to give a damn about teaching their kids the difference between right and wrong, are unlikely to care as much about their childrens' education, and are more likely to live in a neighbourhood where crime is prevalent.


    /controversial rant
     
  18. Ivan Seeking

    Ivan Seeking 12,538
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    http://www.mediafamily.org/facts/facts_effect.shtml
     
  19. monique: but like i said i was responding to the 2nd post when you quoted me...
    and i doubt this thread is just talking about just GTA even though it is entitled that.

    brewnog:
    "most deluded juvenile delinquent"-are they juveniles when they firs start out?
    like you said its about the parents...but when the parents dont' care OR care to much...the games then become effectors to the child.

    IMO parents are to blame first but should take the majority of blame while game makers do have some fault in the matter
     
  20. IvanSeeking, I'm not sure that the website you're citing is all that trustworthy, frankly, given that they're one of those "family-oriented" organizations.

    Here's something a little more balanced:

    http://www.1up.com/do/feature?cId=3141144
     
  21. brewnog

    brewnog 2,791
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Well, yes, we're talking about children here.


    The game makers do take responsibility by making clear the content of the game, and classification bodies make sure that the content of the game is clearly labelled on the certificate (on the box), and age restrictions on the sale of the games are imposed. If parents choose to breech these restrictions, then that's no fault of the game.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share a link to this question via email, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Similar discussions for: GTA: San Andreas and psychological consequences
Loading...