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News Guns for four year old children

  1. May 2, 2013 #1

    Evo

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    This is sick and twisted. A rifle for a four year old child?

    http://news.yahoo.com/5-old-boy-shoots-2-old-sister-ky-161229579.html [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
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  3. May 2, 2013 #2

    Monique

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    Aren't there regulations on how old one must be in order to hold a gun? Like for alcohol or driving?
     
  4. May 2, 2013 #3

    Astronuc

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    ". . . the family didn't realize a bullet was left inside it." That's an example of a family that shouldn't have guns in the house. They have payed a high price for their negligence.


    Interesting webpage - PRODUCT CATEGORY - CRICKETT TOYS & BOOKS :rolleyes:
    http://www.crickett.com/index.php?cPath=12

    Somehow I don't think guns and toys go well together.

    Apparently not in Kentucky, or the laws are insufficient. A child could not purchase a gun, but that would not preclude a parent from providing a gun to a child.

    This appears to be the Ky statutes on guns.
    http://www.lrc.ky.gov/krs/237-00/chapter.htm
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2013
  5. May 2, 2013 #4

    Borg

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    My favorite comment at the bottom of the article:
    So true.
     
  6. May 2, 2013 #5

    Borg

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    When I was in my twenties, I had a friend who pointed an empty shotgun at me and pulled the trigger. I have seldom been angrier at anyone. Although it wasn't over this particular incident, we aren't friends anymore.
     
  7. May 2, 2013 #6

    russ_watters

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    Right. Gun safety rule #1: Always treat a gun like it is loaded.
     
  8. May 2, 2013 #7

    Astronuc

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    I knew that when I handled guns, and also to make sure any gun I handled was empty unless I was preparing to use it. I shot 0.22, 0.3006, 0.303 rifles, 0.22 pistol and 20 and 12 gauge shotguns. I'd keep the rifle/shotgun down or vertical, and safety on if the gun had one, when carrying it. I never pointed a gun at someone.

    I'm not sure a 4 or 5 year old understands that it's inappropriate to point a gun at someone.

    I'm sad for the family.
     
  9. May 2, 2013 #8

    Borg

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    Same here. When handling a weapon, I am always aware of where it's pointed. That includes paying attention to whether it's pointed at hard surfaces w.r.t. potential ricochets. A five year old can't be expected to think like that.
     
  10. May 2, 2013 #9

    FlexGunship

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    Ugh, this is awful. I don't know how much I'm repulsed by the idea of a "gun for a child" (honestly, if you want to teach your kid to handle firearms, that's your business) but the fact that the parents essentially left if up to a four year old to make safe decisions about a firearm is the worst kind of negligent parenting! I wouldn't trust a four year old with scissors without close supervision.
     
  11. May 2, 2013 #10

    cobalt124

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    Basic common sense (and natural fear?) surely, as would be not giving a gun to a child, loaded or not. Does the availability of weaponry in America make people complacent about this or have peoples attitudes in general (not just in America) changed? Is common sense (and natural fear?) in decline?
     
  12. May 2, 2013 #11

    FlexGunship

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    I think the issue of instructing your child in the use of a firearm is strictly a personal one. You and I might think it's dangerous and stupid, but it's no more illegal than telling your child about intelligent design. Furthermore, a four year old is certainly incapable of understanding and practicing firearm safety, however, a child may also be incapable of reading, but that doesn't mean you forbid them from reading or being read to.

    So, I don't know if "common sense" indicates that you shouldn't instruct your child in the safe use of a firearm... but common sense CERTAINLY indicates that you don't leave a firearm, loaded or not, just lying around... ever.

    Evidently so.

    EDIT: Also, I don't know is "natural fear" is fair. I don't have a "natural fear" of firearms. My heart doesn't race when my friends compare rifles; I don't panic when a buddy shows off his new handgun; and going to the firing range doesn't fill me with dread.

    That being said, there are plenty of things that I do have a "natural fear" of: flying stinging insects, lightning, heights, and people wearing excessively baggy clothing.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2013
  13. May 2, 2013 #12
    Is this a "toy" gun or a real gun? Whatever it may, personally, I don't like giving kids' toys that can inculcate the value of "brutality". And it is the parent's responsibility to ensure their child's safety. They should have checked if the toy is safe or not before they give it to the kids...
     
  14. May 2, 2013 #13

    jim hardy

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    He'd have to be taught that it's inappropriate.

    He's doubtless seen plenty of people shot on TV.

    This one falls directly on those parents.
    Who knows why they left a five year old, a two year old and a loaded gun together nsupervised. Presumably it's a case of terminal stupid but you cant rule out something worse.
     
  15. May 2, 2013 #14
    Some states here in the US just keep reinforcing the negative perception the rest of the US has of them.
     
  16. May 2, 2013 #15

    turbo

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    When I was 10, my family moved to a shamble of a house across the road. My father bought a new Rugger .44 magnum carbine, and I inherited his .30 cal M1 carbine, which I had trained on extensively under boot-camp dad. After our first hunting session with our "new" guns, I tore down my carbine, cleaned, oiled, and reassembled it as I had been taught. My father was outside talking to an uncle that had stopped by, so I tore into his gun, too. When he came back inside, he was shocked and asked if I knew to put that thing back together. There wasn't a problem, but he had me feeling nervous for a bit. Just don't have any spare parts when the puzzle is built.

    BTW, 10 year-olds in Maine can hunt big game with supervision, though you have to be 16 to hunt on your own.
     
  17. May 2, 2013 #16

    russ_watters

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    No, I'm pretty sure it is incidents like this that are in decline , the just get a lot of publicity due to the tragedy factor. I'll look up stats though....
     
  18. May 2, 2013 #17
    Some states here in the US just keep reinforcing the negative perception THE REST OF THE WORLD has on the US.

    Immediate edit: Sometimes I wonder if we even deserve our independence (Hey, someone needs to keep us in check).
     
  19. May 2, 2013 #18

    FlexGunship

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    You can certainly give up your's if you like. I'm going to keep mine, thanks.
     
  20. May 2, 2013 #19
    I'm not saying we should give it up, I'm just saying a bit of regulation may help... juuuuuuust a tad.
     
  21. May 2, 2013 #20

    FlexGunship

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    You regulate yourself, and I'll regulate myself.
     
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