H20 is polar because

  • #1
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The electronegativity of Oxygen is higher than that of H, thus the electrons tend to stay a little more on the oxygens electron orbitals, right?
 

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  • #2
Borek
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That's true, but that's not all true. Think about molecule shape.
 
  • #3
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Just to expand on what Borek has said.

Why is carbon dioxide not polar while water is polar (in terms of net dipole not polarity of individual bonds)?
 
  • #4
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Just to expand on what Borek has said.

Why is carbon dioxide not polar while water is polar (in terms of net dipole not polarity of individual bonds)?

Hmmm, I do not know. Because if oxygen has a much higher electronegativity than C, I don't know why.
 
  • #5
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Remember that these are charges, and if we have two equal charges acting in opposite directions, they will cancel each other out.
 
  • #6
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Why is H20 polar, and C02 not?

I mean, if oxygen has a higher electronegativity than Hydrogen, I can see why H20 is a polar bonds, the electrons orbit around O a little more than the two H atoms. But why isn't C02 polar?
 
  • #7
Redbelly98
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CO2 is a linear molecule; the two polar bonds point in opposite directions, and cancel each other out.

Since H20 is a bent molecule, the two polar bonds don't cancel each other.

EDIT:
Here's an image of a water molecule: the left side is more negative than the right side, resulting in an overall dipole moment for the molecule:

[URL]http://bioweb.wku.edu/courses/biol115/Wyatt/water1.gif[/URL]
 
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  • #8
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CO2 is a linear molecule; the two polar bonds point in opposite directions, and cancel each other out.

Since H20 is a bent molecule, the two polar bonds don't cancel each other.

EDIT:
Here's an image of a water molecule: the left side is more negative than the right side, resulting in an overall dipole moment for the molecule:

[URL]http://bioweb.wku.edu/courses/biol115/Wyatt/water1.gif
[/URL]

I see, just how like charges in a regular atom cancel each other out? Thank you for the answer.
 
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  • #9
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I see, thank you
 
  • #10
Borek
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I see, thank you

Just in case you only think you see - what is geometry of both molecules? CO2? H2O?
 
  • #11
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Just in case you only think you see - what is geometry of both molecules? CO2? H2O?

Well that is what I don't understand, if they are both covalent, what forces cause them to bond with the geometry they have e.g linear or bent bonds?
 
  • #12
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Do you own a General Chemistry text? I would suggest purchasing one, these are things that are pretty clearly explained in the text that I own.

As far as your current question:
http://www.chem.purdue.edu/gchelp/vsepr/
 
  • #13
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Do you own a General Chemistry text? I would suggest purchasing one, these are things that are pretty clearly explained in the text that I own.

As far as your current question:
http://www.chem.purdue.edu/gchelp/vsepr/

My middle school doesn't have a library, and the library near me have few but I will check.
 
  • #14
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Wait, you go to middle school and you're trying to learn college level general chemistry?
 
  • #16
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Wait, you go to middle school and you're trying to learn college level general chemistry?

Studying physics to, along with astrochemistry.
 
  • #17
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:eek:
 

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