Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Hacking applicants turned down by Stanford

  1. May 31, 2005 #1
    I still don't get the reason for turning down their applications, maybe if they did something to influence their admissions decision I would understand.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 31, 2005 #2

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Because hacking into the school's computer system is unethical, at the very least. Not to mention dumb.
     
  4. May 31, 2005 #3

    Pengwuino

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    exactly! And besides! The business world cant have its good name tarnished by introducing such unethical people into the bloodline ;)
     
  5. May 31, 2005 #4

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    These people got caught being unethical before even getting started, they'd never stand a chance in business. :biggrin:
     
  6. May 31, 2005 #5

    Pengwuino

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    haha... who knows, maybe their action would have qualified for course credit if they hacked someone else :D
     
  7. May 31, 2005 #6

    dduardo

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus

    I think it is the web developers fault for allowing this to happen. It would be completely irresponsible to not have some type of effective timestamp that prevents a page from generating before an acceptable time. This is basic security 101.

    This happens all the time with corporate press releases. For example if a company has their press releases as such:

    http://www.companyA.com/pr/release-2005-05-24.html

    I don't consider it hacking or unethical if I try entering dates in the future such as:

    http://www.companyA.com/pr/release-2005-06-24.html
     
  8. May 31, 2005 #7

    Pengwuino

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I think its the hackers fault for hacking in
     
  9. May 31, 2005 #8

    Hurkyl

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    And it's the homeowner's fault for leaving his door open, allowing people to steal his stuff too, eh?

    Same analogy. (I'm feeling lazy!)
     
  10. May 31, 2005 #9
    Stanford looked bad and needed to do something to take away the attention. If they had allowed the students to attend their school it would be like inviting hackers from all over the globe to take a stab at Standford.
     
  11. May 31, 2005 #10
    The applicants more or less took advice from a hacker (I know that is no excuse). I don't think what they did was right either but I'm sure if every one of you on this board come across some website one day that had information about the future, most of you would stop and read every single line.

    Let's say that you came across some government website showing all the lucky people that won't be taxed, would you look? I'm dying to see who replies and says that they won't.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2005
  12. May 31, 2005 #11

    Hurkyl

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Why would I?
     
  13. May 31, 2005 #12

    dduardo

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus

    If you leave your Aston Martin in a bad neighborhood with the doors unlocked and the keys in the ignition, then your an idiot. All i'm trying to say is that there should be a level of accountability on the part of the company writing the software.

    Also, what's so wrong about knowing if you got accepted or not? It's not like your changing your admission status.
     
  14. May 31, 2005 #13
    As a citizen the government is responsible to me. It is my right to view my public records. Stanford is a private university. Their records belong to them, not prospective students. The students cheated and got caught. Maybe their ethical violation was that they couldn't come up with a convincing lie. They'd never make it in the business world anyway. :wink:

    Deny, deny, deny. "My mom must have done it because she was anxious for me." "The hacker did it." "What are you talking about? Did I get in?" "I'll sue unless you can prove I did it."
     
  15. May 31, 2005 #14

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Yes, they should have better security, but that doesn't making hacking ethical. And why do we all need security? Because of unethical people. :grumpy:

    Ok, let's say that you've applied for a job at XYZ company and some hacker tells you how you can break into XYZ company's computer and see the status of your application. XYZ finds out what you've done and decides not to hire you. Can you guess why?
     
  16. May 31, 2005 #15

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Tried hacking into the IRS website to check your tax status lately? :biggrin:
     
  17. May 31, 2005 #16

    dduardo

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus

    First its cracking, not hacking.

    Second of all, they aren't breaking into any computers and trying to gain privelege escalation. They are simply manipulating the url string. For all I know some 3rd party javascript from a sketchy site changed the url.

    Url modification is hardly cracking. Stanford just doesn't want to look bad in light of the current identity theft mess (LexisNexis, etc). They are just trying to cover their behind. You know there are people out there asking "If they can easily find out their admission status, what else can they find out?(SS Numbers, Addresses, etc of other people)"

    It also doesn't help that the media is sentationalizing this story.
     
  18. May 31, 2005 #17

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    They accessed information which did not belong to them and had no authorization to view. They got what they deserved.

    Let's change the scenario from computer to real life. I want to check on my application status so I go to the admissions office, the door is closed, but unlocked, (or closer to the computer scenario, the door is locked, but I found the key on the secretary's desk) I let myself in, no one is there, I start going through the filing cabinets looking for my application status, the administrator walks in and finds me. They decide that my behavior is unethical and dismiss my application.

    The students didn't want to wait. Well who does? Sorry, I do not feel sorry for these students, they took a chance (for a really stupid reason) and got caught. There is just no way you can look at this and say they were within their rights to do it. They displayed immaturity and lack of restraint.
     
  19. May 31, 2005 #18
    I can barely operate a computer, nevermind try to hack or crack. But I still think I should have the right to view my own information. I think the government is wrong in this case.
     
  20. May 31, 2005 #19

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Your tax information is available online, without hacking. :wink:
     
  21. May 31, 2005 #20
    Ok, now your just playing with me. :rolleyes: :smile:
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Hacking applicants turned down by Stanford
  1. Hacking bluetooth (Replies: 1)

  2. NES soundcard hacking (Replies: 1)

Loading...