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Hafele-Keating Experiment

  1. Feb 3, 2005 #1
    In 1971, Hafele and Keating made airline flights around the world to test the effect of time dilation on moving atomic clocks. Although special relativity's predictions and the results of the experiment agree reasonably well, it does not give a reason why it only works if the line through the Earth's axis of rotation is chosen as its reference frame. And it gives no reason why this causes a real physical change in the actual times of the atomic clocks.

    It is possible to use an ether theory to model the dilation effects using the ether as an absolute reference frame. Its predictions match those of special relativity, but it predicts that atomic clocks on the Earth are affected by a tiny sidereal fluctuation of around 0.7nS at the equator, and it goes to zero at the poles. This is caused by the rotation of the Earth altering the absolute speed at which the clocks move relative to the ether flow.

    Does anyone know if this effect has been detected?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 3, 2010 #2
    I have two questions about that. How fast where the planes moving (relitive to the air bace) and what is the exact diference between the ground and air clock, and
     
  4. Feb 3, 2010 #3

    bcrowell

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    It works regardless of what reference frame you choose. General relativity doesn't even require that you use an inertial frame.

    This probably falls under PF's prohibition on overly speculative posts: https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=5374
     
  5. Feb 3, 2010 #4

    russ_watters

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    Five year old thread witha banned OP....locked.
     
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