Happy Patty's Day

  • #1
Happy Patty's Day!!!!

Happy St. Patrick's Day to everyone.

I just kicked off an eight hour play list of irish music, poured my first drink, and put the pot with the corned beef on the stove.

How about all of you?

currently playing: Dirty Glass by Dropkick Murphys
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
turbo
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My father's family clans (Orrs and Baileys) made their way to Maine during the Irish potato famine. Some were fishermen, some were farmers, all were dirt-poor. Still, we celebrated.

My wife and I are having a quiet evening at home. Me in my jeans and green T-shirt and green cotton shirt, and her in her pink Capri-pants and white fleece. (Infidel!)
 
  • #3
Evo
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I've got my corned beef ready!
 
  • #4
turbo
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I've got my corned beef ready!
I just read that the Irish celebrated with Irish bacon and cabbage, but when they got to the cities in the US, they couldn't afford to buy bacon, so they turned to corned beef as a cheaper alternative. Hmmm.
 
  • #5
Evo
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I just read that the Irish celebrated with Irish bacon and cabbage, but when they got to the cities in the US, they couldn't afford to buy bacon, so they turned to corned beef as a cheaper alternative. Hmmm.
True, corned beef is not traditional Irish, it's an American creation.
 
  • #6


Turbo said:
My father's family clans (Orrs and Baileys) made their way to Maine during the Irish potato famine. Some were fishermen, some were farmers, all were dirt-poor. Still, we celebrated.
I do not really know my lineage though I have a 'Mc' on my name. ;-)




Drunken Night In London - The Mahones
 
  • #7
turbo
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True, corned beef is not traditional Irish, it's an American creation.
Salted beef more likely originated in Europe, when navies and armies needed to have protein before the age of refrigeration. Canning originated in Europe, too, IIR, when Napoleon needed to have long-term preservation of food for his armies.
 
  • #8


I just read that the Irish celebrated with Irish bacon and cabbage, but when they got to the cities in the US, they couldn't afford to buy bacon, so they turned to corned beef as a cheaper alternative. Hmmm.

I was actually planning on picking up some bacon to finish off the head of cabbage with.

Friends just showed up and we had some "Irish Car Bombs". Now we are going to play a boxing video game (Fight Night Round 4).



Currently: Drunken Sailor - The Blaggards
 
  • #9
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Snakes had the right to live in Ireland too!

speciesists.
 
  • #10


Snakes had the right to live in Ireland too!

speciesists.

Mother F***in Snakes in the Mother F***in Highland!


Girlz on the Fiddle - Mutiny
 
  • #11
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is your avatar a picture of an Ubese bounty hunter holding the "scales of justice"?
 
  • #12
dlgoff
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No Irish in my family, so I just going to drink beer.....red beer.
 
  • #13
Redbelly98
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Time to wear some green!
.
.

 
  • #14


is your avatar a picture of an Ubese bounty hunter holding the "scales of justice"?

Its supposed to be an ape. It kinda loses the resemblance when shrunk.
 
  • #15
Janus
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Snakes had the right to live in Ireland too!

speciesists.

Not only that, but he upset the natural balance of the island. The result: 14 centuries later, the Great Potato blight.
 
  • #16
Evo
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  • #17
turbo
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Not only that, but he upset the natural balance of the island. The result: 14 centuries later, the Great Potato blight.
We got hit with the same blight last season, destroying much of Maine's potato crop. Luckily, the US food supply is a bit more diverse than that of 19th C Ireland. I don't know how many of my ancestors died trying to get out of Ireland, but I have the blight to thank for my presence in Maine. Well, that and the onerous laws of the English that forced Irish-owned farms to be divided equally amongst all male heirs (smaller and smaller with every generation) and forbade the loaning of money to the Irish to buy property.
 
  • #18
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I'm neither Irish nor Catholic, and I'm a teetotaler. As you can imagine, I don't celebrate this holiday.
 
  • #19


I'm neither Irish nor Catholic, and I'm a teetotaler. As you can imagine, I don't celebrate this holiday.

You can have some corned beef (or bacon) and cabbage and maybe have some cider while listening to irish music. :-)
 
  • #20
turbo
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I'm neither Irish nor Catholic, and I'm a teetotaler. As you can imagine, I don't celebrate this holiday.
I'm only about 1/2 Irish and I am no longer Catholic, but I can hold up part of the beer-debt for you. ;-)

BTW, in this part of the world, St. Patrick's day is not only a time to celebrate our Irish heritage (if you've got it). It's also a time to thumb our noses at the English who had the temerity to force our ancestors to take arms against the French (all able-bodied men were required to train as militia, and keep and bear arms), only to find out that once the colonists got fed up, they couldn't manage to transport and supply a standing army sufficient to keep the colonists under control.
 
  • #21
lisab
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I'm a lot Irish...yay! I'm going to celebrate today by studying all evening and long into the night...sigh.
 
  • #22
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I'm only about 1/2 Irish and I am no longer Catholic, but I can hold up part of the beer-debt for you. ;-)

BTW, in this part of the world, St. Patrick's day is not only a time to celebrate our Irish heritage (if you've got it). It's also a time to thumb our noses at the English who had the temerity to force our ancestors to take arms against the French (all able-bodied men were required to train as militia, and keep and bear arms), only to find out that once the colonists got fed up, they couldn't manage to transport and supply a standing army sufficient to keep the colonists under control.

They should have stayed out of The Troubles too. The British never give us Catholic Irish a break!
 
  • #23
OmCheeto
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(hic)!

Where's Hypatia on her day?
 
  • #24
cristo
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BTW, in this part of the world, St. Patrick's day is not only a time to celebrate our Irish heritage (if you've got it). It's also a time to thumb our noses at the English ...

You need an excuse to do that? :confused:

They should have stayed out of The Troubles too. The British never give us Catholic Irish a break!

Now that is the most hypocritical post that I've ever seen coming from an American!


Oh, and by the way, it's actually called St. Paddy's day, since the guy's name was really Padraig. Of course, you lot being well informed Irish descendants knew that.. :uhh:
 
  • #25
turbo
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You need an excuse to do that? :confused:
Not really. We have Independence Day. Other holidays are tweaking, at best.
 
  • #26
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(hic)!

Where's Hypatia on her day?

I worked and then went to a local pub for a great meal and a few pints of
Beamish. Of course, every day is Patty's day for me.
 
  • #27


Oh, and by the way, it's actually called St. Paddy's day, since the guy's name was really Padraig. Of course, you lot being well informed Irish descendants knew that.. :uhh:
I've seen it both ways. I usually use Paddy but I have seen Patty so often that I thought I was doin it wrong. :-/
bwrTHZx-FkA[/youtube]
 
  • #28
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Now that is the most hypocritical post that I've ever seen coming from an American!

Don't make us come over to wherever you are, liberate and bring democracy to you!
 
  • #29
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I've seen it both ways. I usually use Paddy but I have seen Patty so often that I thought I was doin it wrong. :-/


You will never, ever encounter an Irish person who calls it "Patty's" day; the only people who refer to it thus are American. "Patty" is a girl's name (and an American one at that); "Paddy" and "Patrick" are the anglicised versions of the Irish "Padraig" and hence is the correct term.
 
  • #30
lisab
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You will never, ever encounter an Irish person who calls it "Patty's" day; the only people who refer to it thus are American. "Patty" is a girl's name (and an American one at that); "Paddy" and "Patrick" are the anglicised versions of the Irish "Padraig" and hence is the correct term.

How is Padraig pronounced? My best guess: PAD-rayg. Am I close?
 

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