Harry potter?

  • Thread starter Gale
  • Start date

You read the Harry Potter series?

  • yes, because i read them to some kids...

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    84

learningphysics

Homework Helper
4,099
5
:grumpy: Don't judge a book by the movie! Oy... the movies are ruining the experience... I'm not saying the movies aren't good... but there's only so much of the book that can be packed into 2 hours. There is so much detail in the books.
 

Moonbear

Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
11,349
51
TheStatutoryApe said:
Evo, I have to agree with Integral. I didn't really have much desire to read them myself. I liked the movies and my last g/f urged me to read the books. The first one and the second one are almost entirely the same as the movies. The third is somewhat differant from the movie as the story line is becoming more mature and complex with the age of the characters and readers so there is more back story and more details that just wont fit in a movie. I probably wouldn't have been able to get through reading those three if it weren't for them being quick reads and the way that Rowling writes drew me in. After reading those three though I really wanted to read the rest so I went out and bought the next two books(the first three were loaned to me by my ex). Maybe I just have that need to finish a series when I start it but it really seemed to me that they get better with each installment. I'm hoping that this one continues that trend.
That's about how I got into them. My sister got me the first 3 books as a gift (well, she claimed it was my nephew, but as he was under 2 years old at the time, I suspect he used her money :biggrin:). Everyone had been telling me since the first movie came out that I should read them, and I pretty much had the same attitude Evo has, that they are written for children, and the movie was enjoyable, but nothing to make me want to read the book too. By the time I finished the first three books, I had to head straight to the bookstore and pick up 4 and 5, and by the time I finished #5, they were taking pre-orders on 6, and I had to have it (I read about halfway through 6 last night :biggrin:).

I think that what I like about them that's different from the more "mature" fantasy that Evo speaks of is that I can relate to the characters. It's not such a complete fantasy world as to seem artificial or unreal to me (not to mention, they give the kids rather normal names, so I don't confuse all the characters with weird, made-up names that all sound alike, as I do in more mature fantasy books). As I read them, I feel like a kid again myself, remembering the way we passed notes and thought our teachers looked funny. You almost expect to be able to knock on a brick in the wall and step into Diagon Alley.

To me, I think these will become classic children's literature, much like the Judy Blume series. I'm keeping all the books and will save them for when I have children (or for my nephew), so they can enjoy them as well.

Though, I wonder if they will go over as well for future generations when they can read all the books at once? For the kids reading them now, the books are getting released sort of keeping in time with the kids growing up at the same pace, so they can relate to Harry and friends as they go through those same stages of adolescence. And for adults, we can look back and remember being that age and know exactly what the characters are going through, but I wonder if it makes as much sense to a 10 yr old to be reading about adventures of 16 yr olds now? They may still enjoy the book, but might not quite relate to the characters the same way an adult would.

Oh, and what I find really funny now is that after spending so much time in discussions with the Brits here at PF, I can also really appreciate much more the very British-ness of the series and writing style.

The books are all quick reads for adults, which is great for when you just have one day when you just want to relax and forget about the real world around us, or wish you could just whip out a magic wand and do all the chores with a swish and a flick.
 

Astronuc

Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
18,548
1,672
Evo said:
Have you read Jordan's "Wheel of Time" series, Feist's books (even if it's only "Magician Apprentice") The Belgariad by Eddings, or "Daughter of the Empire" "Servant of the Empire" by Janny Wurtz, then you will understand what I am used to in a book on fantasy. Oh, if you only knew the worlds I have explored in these incredible books.

Have you read the books on Raistlin and the Kender?

The "Rift War Sagas". Have you read those? The places your imagination will be taken...
I have heard those highly recommended. I have also heard that Feist and Wurtz are better than Jordan in terms of writing.

I still like Harry Potter though.

Raistlin and the Kender are mostly characters from William Connors and Margaret Weiss? The DragonLace series seems an interesting collaboration of many authors.
 

loseyourname

Staff Emeritus
Gold Member
1,717
4
Am I honestly the only person that finds the same old rehashing of magic and mythical creatures to be a little trite? It just seems that Tolkein retold Norse mythology and there has been no original contribution to the genre since. I know there are good stories and there is good writing out there, but isn't the point of fantasy to introduce us to worlds we are not familiar with? That's what I used to love about Louis L'Amour growing up. Sure, he was just retelling Native American mythology in his fantasy tales, but at least it wasn't a retelling of Northern European mythology. 95% of the fantasy genre would have you believe that's all there is. I'd say that's another part of the huge appeal of Star Wars. Instead of just being the same old rehashing of Arthurian Knights, Lucas melds them with Japanese Samurai and puts them in a western set in space. Only this western has WWII-style dogfights and the Knights learn magic from a half-Christian, half-Taoist energy field! If we learned anything from this, it's that your story will feel far more fresh and exciting if you borrow from a wide breadth of genres, instead of sticking so faithfully to the traditions of only one.
 
yep i luv em... get embarassed saying it sometimes but hey they're fun... it's all in the head... i remember details which is why i enjoy this book so much... I ADORE ronald weasley's character isnt he just hilarious? i don't care what people say even if it is for 12 yr olds (which it isnt anymore she tries, but as them being teenagers it becomes harder for her not to u curse words! teheehee) :biggrin: but it's hilarious how people can say "I hate it... it's so kiddish" without even reading it :grumpy: :confused:
i cried at the end of the 4th and 6th books :cry: sad events...

Peace!
 

DocToxyn

Science Advisor
424
0
Evo said:
Ok, you both know how much I think of your opinions, (not to mention a couple of my favorite guys) :grumpy:

Oh, but you guys don't know the wonderful books I've read!!!

Have you read Jordan's "Wheel of Time" series, Feist's books (even if it's only "Magician Apprentice") The Belgariad by Eddings, or "Daughter of the Empire" "Servant of the Empire" by Janny Wurtz, then you will understand what I am used to in a book on fantasy. Oh, if you only knew the worlds I have explored in these incredible books.

Have you read the books on Raistlin and the Kender?

The "Rift War Sagas". Have you read those? The places your imagination will be taken...

Have you read these and still think Harry Potter is on a similar level? (actually I bought two of the videos and they're in my closet, haven't had a chance to watch them yet) :redface:

Darn it! We need to get together and start a book club!!!

TSA...if you haven't read these yet, I'm willing to read them over again, so we could read them together. Would you have the time? Anyone else want to branch out into some good books?
Good picks Evo. I've covered all those except the Wurtz works, I'll have to pick those up. I also have read the Harry Potter books, mostly because they are around since my wife reads them. They are "simpler" than the Jordan or Tolkien series, but they're fun and the imagery is very strong. It's similar to reading Brooks' Shannara series and then going to his Magic Kingdom for Sale: Sold! books, the later being fluffier than his other works. A couple of other suggestions - Kushiel's Legacy series by Jacquline Carey (rather racy :blushing:, but good action too), L.E. Modesitt's Recluse series, I'll have to think of some others.
 
639
2
hmm, interesting that the poll shows everyone who's read them to have loved them... no one's read them and only thought, meh.... says something maybe?

anyways, i too thought i wouldn't like them. my mum bought the first three for my younger siblings, and they were too lazy to read them. i was vehemently refusing to read them myself, (they were just way too popular.... which led me to believe they were crap seeing as i don't have much faith in the general public...) but, my sibs wanted to hear the stories... so i started reading to them both every night. usually though, i read a book straight through in one sitting, so i got frustrated one night after they slept, and just finished the book. after that, i started to read the second one. (my mum eventually bought the books-on-tape for my other sibs.) and after the third, i was hooked. the third was probably my favorite.

anyways, i think they are pretty decent. and yes, they're similar to many fantasies... but i think Rowling created a really fantastic world, with loads of details and whats most brilliant, is that its set in the present, right under our noses. so it makes it feel more real. she did create a lot of her own creatures though, with excellent imagery. a lot of it is too predictable maybe... i think especially in the 6th book. i mean, i was surprised... (well, mostly in disbelief) about a few things... but mostly it was my naivety...

anyways, i think the books are great, and if nothing else, at least she's inspired a generation to read.
 
732
2
I confess that though I've seen the movies I have yet to read any of the books. However, It's more procrastination than loathing to read them. I grew up on tolkein and c.s. lewis, and i was entranced (I didn't know much about norse mythology at 11 years of age). So these stories do hold my interest, even if they are for kids. Just like trains, they're made for kids, but grownups love to play with them too :wink:
 
loseyourname said:
Am I honestly the only person that finds the same old rehashing of magic and mythical creatures to be a little trite? It just seems that Tolkein retold Norse mythology and there has been no original contribution to the genre since. I know there are good stories and there is good writing out there, but isn't the point of fantasy to introduce us to worlds we are not familiar with? That's what I used to love about Louis L'Amour growing up. Sure, he was just retelling Native American mythology in his fantasy tales, but at least it wasn't a retelling of Northern European mythology. 95% of the fantasy genre would have you believe that's all there is. I'd say that's another part of the huge appeal of Star Wars. Instead of just being the same old rehashing of Arthurian Knights, Lucas melds them with Japanese Samurai and puts them in a western set in space. Only this western has WWII-style dogfights and the Knights learn magic from a half-Christian, half-Taoist energy field! If we learned anything from this, it's that your story will feel far more fresh and exciting if you borrow from a wide breadth of genres, instead of sticking so faithfully to the traditions of only one.
This is pretty much the same reason why I rarely read fantasy. I can only read so many times about what is more or less the same world of dragons and knights and magicians(Not that I would prefer not to read them Evo, just not all the time. I'm still interested in the book club idea.:smile:). I enjoyed Piers Anthony's Incarnations of Immortality series. It's also not a very serious read but definitely creative in my opinion. And Tim Powers is definitely very creative. The last book I read by him was called Declare. It was set during the Cold War, the main character was a british spy and his nemesis was Kim Philby the infamous double agent from that era. The supernatural elements involved were djinn. In his books there is always a supernatural world behind the scenes that has been influencing history. In this book the soviets are attempting to weoponize djinn for use against the US. The main character is from a special devision of MI6 that deals with these sorts of things. It may sound silly but you really have to read it to apreciate the way in which he pulls this sort of thing off. The way he writes is actually quite serious in tone. And he always interlaces real historical people and events in his stories. Quite a bit of the story line revolves around the real Kim Philby and the things that he did in life. He doesn't rewrite history he just adds to it in the gaps of information. I haven't read it but he did the same thing in Dinner at Deviant's Place which revolves around a time spent at a particular mansion by Bram Stoker and Percy and Mary Shelly, which actually occured. I'm rambling...
 
I don't read much, but I do read harry potter. i'm on like, chapter twelve. I stayed till midnight as well. Actually, I didn't get my book till about one, and got home at 1:15. My back was killing me.
 

Astronuc

Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
18,548
1,672
I just finished "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince" after spending the last 3 evenings immersed in it.

Waiting for the next one. Presumably, the next book provides the climax and resolution. I suppose we'll have to wait two years.

Perhaps somewhat predictable - but it is nevertheless compelling.

As for escaping in fiction or fantasy - I can't really. I have seen too much in the world.

Reading Harry Potter, I see the parallels in real life.
 

Janus

Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Insights Author
Gold Member
3,375
1,042
Gale17 said:
hmm, interesting that the poll shows everyone who's read them to have loved them... no one's read them and only thought, meh.... says something maybe?
I don't know. My daughter read the first book and it left her with no desire to read the rest. On the other hand, she devoured The Hobbit, And then couldn't wait to read the Lord of the Rings trilogy.

Also, I note that there is no "started to read it, but didn't care for it" option in the poll.
 
Last edited:

JamesU

Gold Member
732
3
dduardo said:
This is a hilarious video clip of someone ruining the ending of the lastest book for people at a B&N

http://www.fazed.org/video/view/?id=33 [Broken]

Don't watch if you don't want to know the ending.
:rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

I haven't read the ending, but snape killing dumbledore is pretty much what I expected.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
58
0
Gale17 said:
hmm, interesting that the poll shows everyone who's read them to have loved them... no one's read them and only thought, meh.... says something maybe?

anyways, i too thought i wouldn't like them. my mum bought the first three for my younger siblings, and they were too lazy to read them. i was vehemently refusing to read them myself, (they were just way too popular.... which led me to believe they were crap seeing as i don't have much faith in the general public...) but, my sibs wanted to hear the stories... so i started reading to them both every night. usually though, i read a book straight through in one sitting, so i got frustrated one night after they slept, and just finished the book. after that, i started to read the second one. (my mum eventually bought the books-on-tape for my other sibs.) and after the third, i was hooked. the third was probably my favorite.

anyways, i think they are pretty decent. and yes, they're similar to many fantasies... but i think Rowling created a really fantastic world, with loads of details and whats most brilliant, is that its set in the present, right under our noses. so it makes it feel more real. she did create a lot of her own creatures though, with excellent imagery. a lot of it is too predictable maybe... i think especially in the 6th book. i mean, i was surprised... (well, mostly in disbelief) about a few things... but mostly it was my naivety...

anyways, i think the books are great, and if nothing else, at least she's inspired a generation to read.

Anyway i read one of the books (the prisoner of something) and thought it suxed. But then again im HAte children ,so i wouldnt like stories about children.
 
i tried to read this thread, but the geekiness is just too much...must leave.
 
J.K. is clearly starting to get tire of writing them, as per the huge page number in OOTP, and then how it dwindled way down in HBP. Plus she said after the seventh book, which is the last, a prequel or anything of that sort won't be needed.
 

selfAdjoint

Staff Emeritus
Gold Member
Dearly Missed
6,764
5
I just finished Half Blood Prince. I had ordered it months ago, and got it on THE DAY, last Saturday. I thought it was good, and ended very well (that is, of course, badly). I have read each one as they came out and did a rereading of the earlier ones when Phoenix came out because there was so much dependence on hints dropped in earlier books.

My daughter, son and son's wife and I form a discussion group on the series. In fact my daughter, on a business trip, bought a copy of the English edition of HBP in London last Saturday. A modest coup, at least in our family.
 
thats awesome...my sisters don't like talking about it...they just read it...never remembers anything from the prior books
 

arildno

Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Gold Member
Dearly Missed
9,948
130
Having finished reading the "half-blood prince", I can now inform those of you who haven't read it that Hermione Granger did NOT fail her O.W.L. exams.




Hmm..did I reveal too much of the plotline now?
 
Well you at least didn't tell them which subject she only got an Excellent in.
 
HP 1-5 was good.But in the 6th one the plot loses all originality as JKR uses
SPOLIER ALERT

the oldest villian trick on the book-"my like is in my pet parakeet" from the arabian nights
/SPOILER ALERT

and ruins the series.

Anyway to add to evos collection,I have greately enjoyed Myth series by R.Asprin.
 

Ouabache

Science Advisor
Homework Helper
1,338
7
Of course I enjoy the Harry Potter stories, but then again one look at my *Location gave that away. :biggrin: The movies are fun too!! I accept them on their own, without expecting them to follow each book exactly. One thing I have noticed after watching the movies, whenever I read a Potter book, my mind hears the British pronunciation.

*When I read that a pensieve was a place to store thoughts, it sounded clever. I recalled penser in French means to think.
 
Last edited:
666
5
I read the Belgariad and Mallorean (David Eddings) serieses several times growing up and I loved them. I would have called them and the James Herriot all creatures great and small series my favorite books ever, until I read Harry Potter. The Harry Potter books are the best books I've ever read. Sure they are simplistic, but decreasingly so. Each book is better than the last.
 

Chi Meson

Science Advisor
Homework Helper
1,767
10
I grew up with SF and fantasy books; I loved "lord of the rings" so much, I even read the "Simarillion" (which was quite a snoozer at the age of 12). THen something happened when I got to college; I doubled as an English major and started to read "literature" (pronounced with a snooty upperclass accent).

For about 15 years, all I read was "literature." I was a complete snob. Everything that was popular was "beneath me." I even got a MFA (master of fine arts) in writing (don't ask). Consequently every movie I saw, every book or poem I read, every picture I looked at, I had to mentally write an opinion paper on it.

This maniacal mind binder (see? it paid off!) of "overeducation" prevented me from simply enjoying things. I read the first HP book five years ago to "see what the fuss was about." Now I've read them all and I gotta tell you, I am awaiting the final installment! (Don't care about the movies though).
 
Last edited:

Related Threads for: Harry potter?

  • Posted
Replies
13
Views
1K
  • Posted
2 3
Replies
52
Views
5K
  • Posted
Replies
10
Views
1K
  • Posted
2
Replies
26
Views
8K
Replies
1
Views
2K

Physics Forums Values

We Value Quality
• Topics based on mainstream science
• Proper English grammar and spelling
We Value Civility
• Positive and compassionate attitudes
• Patience while debating
We Value Productivity
• Disciplined to remain on-topic
• Recognition of own weaknesses
• Solo and co-op problem solving
Top