Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Has St. Elmo's fire burned out?

  1. Feb 19, 2013 #1
    I'm watching St. Elmo's fire (SEF) right now on Vh1 classic and was reliving a little nostalgia when I did a "cast and crew" check on the actors to see how old they were now. Turns out that just about all of them turned 50 within the last year. Fifty! OMG. I was in high school when that movie came out so I'm not quite there but, hell, is it all over? I can't believe we (the X generation) are becoming elderly people already. I'm not ready.

    Is this really happening or are things different today? Is 50 the new 40, or even 30? Please tell me yes.

    Also, I loved SEF and all of the other teen movies of the 80's. The only hiccup with SEF I thought, though, was Emilio's fanatic infatuation with Adie, who I think is a dog, really. That subplot to the movie I didn't find convincing and I think detracts from an otherwise great 80's timepiece. How about your thoughts?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 19, 2013 #2

    strangerep

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    No one is. You just kinda start slowing down in yourself while the passage of years around you speeds up alarmingly...
    Definitely not the new 30. Probably not even the new 40.
    Aww, but she smiles sweetly. (But if Andie MacDowell in that film is a "dog", geez you must have stratospheric standards.)
    Agree. It could have been done better.
    I saw it soon after it came out, and mostly loved it. I came away then with a particular idea about the meaning/relevance of the title "St Elmo's Fire": I thought it was about how one reaches for something, but it's actually insubstantial. I.e., all the main characters were pursuing will-o'-the-wisps.

    But 20+ yrs later I watched the movie again, and re-listened carefully to the dialog between Billy and Jules on this point towards the end and heard something a bit different.
    Then, just now, I read the Wikipedia entry about the film which has a 3rd interpretation (see near the end). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Elmo's_Fire_(film)

    From your choice of thread title ("burned out") I get the feeling you interpreted it as yet something else again.(?)
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2013
  4. Feb 19, 2013 #3
    I'd say more like she smiles creepily. I didn't even like her in Groundhog Day, and that movie was practically flawless. Two great movies almost undone by the Mac.
     
  5. Feb 19, 2013 #4

    strangerep

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    :surprised Oh, now them's fightin' words! :grumpy: :grumpy: :grumpy:

    :tongue2:
     
  6. Feb 19, 2013 #5
    Is that right Emelio? When's the last time she sat through a whole meal without having to return to the "hospital"?
     
  7. Feb 19, 2013 #6

    strangerep

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    :rofl: Hah! I didn't see that coming. Oh dear,....

    Well, anyway,... you haven't answered the question I asked near the end of my post #2. What's the correct or deeper meaning/significance of the title "St Elmo's Fire"?
    I really would like to hear other people's takes on that since I was kinda disturbed that I might have got it noticeably wrong when I first watched the film.
     
  8. Feb 19, 2013 #7
    It was the name of the bar, Strangerep, what are you talking about?...

    Oh, you mean a deeper double entendre type of deal...Yeah, ok. Well, I think it may be what my initial post alluded to. This epoch in their lives was a moment in time, a flash in the pan, if you will, which is what a St. Elmo's fire is..http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Elmo's_fire

    That's what I took from it. That was really kind of the idea. These kids just graduating. Uneasy about leaving their comfy niche, which was inevitable, and that comfy niche and its brief transient evolution was the St. Elmo's fire. It was kind of summed up at the end when Demi Moore Moore said, "how bout we go for beers at St. Elmos?" When she said it in the beginning of the movie, everyone was all in, at the end of the movie, everyone had other things to do....So sad.
     
  9. Feb 20, 2013 #8

    strangerep

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Yes -- although, from your answer I'm now thinking maybe triple-entendre.
    Hmm, that's a 4th interpretation. Interesting -- I hadn't thought of that angle. St Elmo's fire was sometimes taken as a sign of the presence of a guardian saint, and that's sort of what I thought the dialog between Billy and Jules was vaguely about. Now I'm gonna have to watch the movie again and listen more carefully to the dialog between Billy and Jules. (I mean when she's having a breakdown inside her apartment after it's been stripped of all furnishings, not when they're all reasonably happy again at the end of the movie).

    Then again, maybe I'm just reading far more into it than the author ever intended.
    Maybe it's just the theme music that got to me.
     
  10. Feb 20, 2013 #9
    Actually, I think it is just the theme song. It's so captivating it makes you think there's more there than there really is...
     
  11. Feb 20, 2013 #10
    I don't mean the song St. Elmo's fire (man in motion) by John Parr. Sorry if I inferred that. That song sucks, dude.

    I mean the ever present background piano music, you know that theme music, as you say... Just for the record.
     
  12. Feb 20, 2013 #11

    strangerep

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Yeah -- you mean this one, right?



    (after the ads, of course...)

    Makes me want to own a piano or synth again so I can play it. :-)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  13. Feb 20, 2013 #12
    Yeah, so full of hope. It makes me think I can still make it, all is not lost..there is hope, Marge, we can do it!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Has St. Elmo's fire burned out?
  1. St Patrick's Day (Replies: 30)

Loading...