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Has U.S. 'Demand' for Illegal Undocumented Labor Gone Too Far?

  1. Dec 12, 2005 #1
    "60 Minutes TV News" led off this evening with a discussion of key issues facing illegal immigration in the U.S. - how after reserecting huge walls and tightening border check points - illegal immigration still grows at an even faster rate, now with soaring death rates in the Arizona desert. As we look for answers, trying to balance the demand for cheap labor in the U.S. against the poor in Mexico willing to risk death and injury to come here and work illegally, and weigh the "overall costs" to states and the federal government trying to prevent and then later care for illegal immigrants - the arguments which the "meatpacking industries" in the states of Iowa and Nebraska give in support of securing cheap illegal labor comes "too close" to what the "South" argued 150 years ago in support of slave labor. However, in no way did "60 Minutes" state such a relational argument here. But one could infer it - based upon arguments apparently given by Iowa and Nebraska meatpackers.

    SEE page 3 on 60 Minutes Dec. 11, 2005 story below:


    Has the U.S. gone too far in pressuring industries to increase productivity and profits by 'demanding' cheap and illegal labor, placing years of high standards on social and economic policy at risk?

    From the mid-1800s to nearly year 2000, our sustained growth and initiatives for sound economic and public policy made the U.S. model the envy of the world? But in 2005, we are now in urgent need of a major overhaul of our labor and immagration policies. But what are they?
  2. jcsd
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