Have a look at my woodworking!

  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

I started this topic to introduce one of my hobbies which is woodworking, and so that others can also showcase their skills, abilities and builds. It doesn't have to be just woodwork, this can include projects, electronics, metal fabrication, mechanical ect. Just include all your steps math and chemistry and science or whatever went into your creation along with all the blood sweat and tears. In my post, I will include all measurements, dimensions, materials, hardware, methods, tools, along with tips tricks, problems "and solutions" I came up with along the way. I will include pictures of tools some of the math and all that went into my manufacturing process with photos of my project in the raw......and after that a completely finished work of art.

The start,
It all started with a trip to a furniture store and my Girl friend had a hard time trying to to select a set of end tables to go with the couch and recliner we purchased. I made the casual comment that " I could build a set better then any they have in here" all of which were over priced for what they were, (assembly line particle board tables with fake vinyl veneer on top. The few "real wood pieces they had were outrageously priced. She said ok build me some, me and my big mouth..lol

Well now I had to deliver so we went to the hardware store up the street and began the martial and hardware selection process.
I began by envisioning a basic design in my head. I pictured a simple table with a drawer and a magazine rack on the bottom.

The material:
So I purchased 8 premade wooden legs, 1, 4'x11 1/2''x 3/4'' pine 1, 4'x17 3/8" x 3/4 inch piece of raw project grade pine. 1 piece of 4'x 22" x 3/4, 16'x3 1/2" x 3/4" pine blank, 16' x 5 1/2" x 3/4" pine blank, 4, 1 1/2''x1 1/2"x 8' a few 3/8" dowel rods a few 5/16" dowel rods. 2 brass handles and 4 18" drawer slides. 150 grit sand paper 200 grit sandpaper L brackets straight brackets, wood screws, stain, polyurethane, foam brushes, stainable wood glue, stainable wood filler, finishing nails and a 12 pack of cokezero cause I was in for the long hall at this point.

The tools:
I did this all in our sun room which is a small space but just large enough for a couple of saw bucks and my power tools. I used a Jigsaw, a circular saw, a hand drill, a wood router, and an elliptical sander "jitter bug". Hand tools: combination square, carpenters square, calipers, tape measure hammer nail punch putty knife, utility knife, pliers, screwdrivers

The cuts:
First I had to cut the legs to size because the were pre made for other type projects I had to cut them down to meet my needs. I had (8) legs to cut all uneven surfaces and they all had to be reasonably square and I have NO TABLE SAW. Hummm.....I was a welder fabricator at one time so I did what a fabricator does, I made a jig..lol. The legs were 28 inches long an meant to screw directly into a table top. My tables had to be 26 inches period from floor to top. so I jigs up my legs to cut them at 22" taking off only 5 15/16" inches, I did not take into consideration the thickness of the wood and miscalculated 9 inches lol. Plus the legs were a slight bit off square to begin with, so cutting more off wasn't a problem. Then I cut the tops, I would have liked them to be 24''x 22'' but I only had 4 feet so I cut them (2) 23 15/16"x 22" got to allow for your blade width. I then cut (2) drawer cabinet bottoms which I made at 20x17 3/8". (4) cabinet sides 20''x5 1/2'' and (2) cabinet backs 15 1/8'' x5 1/2''. I cut the drawer it self out of (2) ,11 1/2'' x 18'' the 3 1/2'' sides I cut (4) 19 1/2''x 3 1/2'' and (4) 11 1/2''x 3 1/2'' and the drawer face I cut out (2) 17 3/8''X 5 1/2''
I trimmed the cabinet bottom with (4) 3 1/2'' x 20'' and (4) 3 1/2'' x 18 7/8''

"remember my blue print is in my head not on paper and I'm doing most of the math in my head, I am actually writing this at work from memory"

Lay out :
I started with the base and traced the legs which were octagonal in shape on the end, and finding the center point which was 13 5/8'' on center for the front and rear and 16 5/8'' on center for both sides. so I cut (4) 1 1/2'' x 1 1/2'' x 14 1/2'' pieces for structural side support and (4) 12 1/2'' piece for the front and rear (8) 1 1/2'' x 1 1/2'' x 5 1/2'' structural for the inside cabinet support....(yes its over kill but I built them to withstand my children's, children's, children's, abuse.....or....who knows when you might have to use an end table that can support a small truck...lol)

The build:
I first constructed the base for the cabinet and framed it with the 3 1/2'' pine and routed a beveled edge on both sides for trim work. Using finishing nails and 5/16" dowel rod.
I then attached the legs to the base, using (4) L brackets and 1/2" long screws glue and 3/8" dowel rod. I also put a finishing nail and long wood screw through the top of the base. Problem, That's when I realized they would be much to tall and there was and an error in calculation, Solution (got out the pen and paper and did some refiguring) and the balls on the end of the legs were just the right length to remove and make them the right height. Since the legs were machined and segmented unless you seen the legs as they were as one whole piece, you'd never know the difference.
After securing the legs I built the cabinet separate with the 1 1/2'' x 1 1/2'' supports and the 5 1/2'' pine. I cut 2 more pieces of 1/12'' x 1 1/2'' stock 2 1/2 '' long to add horizontally at the bottom of the cabinet to help attach it and act as (guide for the drawer) then used (4) L brackets to attach the cabinet to the base along with glue and dowel rod.
I then built the drawer out of the 11 1/2'' and framed it with the 3 1/2'' pieces of pine. I then attached the drawer glides to the base and mounted the drawer to the glides. After fitting I took the 20'' x 17 3/8'' x 5 1/2'' piece and routed a beveled edge around the piece for the drawer face then clamped and glued to the drawer. then I measured for the center from top to bottom and side to side...the handles are 3'' on center from the middle of the drawer. (The trick, locate and mount the glides to the drawer first, put the drawer in the cabinet and pull the slide out to the first screw hole....I used pennies as spacers once I knew the drawer was straight I pulled it out to the next mounting point). Easy peasy.

Finally I mount the table top, I just center it on the drawer cabinet and finish nailed and glued it in place, I then located the center of each of the cabinet supports and drilled 3/8'' dowel pegs to secure it. Then I routed the beveled edge on top.

The finishing touch: I took the left over 3 1/2'' pieces and some 9 12'' x 3/4'' long pine scrap I had and made a magazine shelf in the shape of an capital "I" with the grain running in 2 different directions I dowel pegged and glued those pieces together then beveled them also. I attached them to the legs located 3'' from the floor, Tip (when working with wood making tables if the legs are "splayed" and things are a little out of square adding trim or a magazine shelf can square it up for ya plus its a nice decorative touch with a purpose.) I'll add more pictures after staining and poly.
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
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The tools
 

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  • #3
ProfuselyQuarky
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Wow, a lot of PFers appear to be woodworkers . . . nice job, gjonesy! :smile:

I'll really like to see it once it's stained!
 
  • #4
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The staining happens tonight.:smile:
 
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For some reason all my picture didnt upload.....did most of the typing at work but had all the pictures on my phone. Must be my crappie LG
 
  • #7
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Me too.
Wow.....nice colorful work. Very detailed as well.
 
  • #8
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20160425_181448.jpg
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drawer and hardware.....wiping them down for staining now.
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my helper lol
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me
 
  • #9
ProfuselyQuarky
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Cool, very cool! (that includes you pic, too :-p)
 
  • #10
phinds
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  • #11
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Will do phinds. Btw i love the intricate carving on that first peice.....got to have skill and precision to do that....well done!
 
  • #12
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One stained one to go....i,ll post both pieces when they are complete
 

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  • #13
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You will notice the legs are a bit darker then the rest. Its actually a different wood and its very porous....Tip you can use a solvent to lighten stain. I used googone but you can uae alcohol, acetone or lacquer thinner to lighten stain. Or you can thin up your stain before application. There is also a woodworkers trick called "doping" 3 parts water and one part wood glue....simply whipe on the porous material or end grain and let dry, it wont absorb as much stain. :smile:
 
  • #14
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@phinds, I am very impressed by your designs, you must have good understanding of geometry and math to create such masterful works. What all goes into creating a piece? It also takes a good understanding of the types of wood and grains you are turning on a lathe.
 
  • #15
phinds
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@phinds, I am very impressed by your designs, you must have good understanding of geometry and math to create such masterful works. What all goes into creating a piece? It also takes a good understanding of the types of wood and grains you are turning on a lathe.
Thanks, but it's actually probably a bit more random than you think for most of them. Over time I just figured out what works well and what doesn't. A lot of it is just trial and error.
 
  • #16
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Thanks, but it's actually probably a bit more random than you think for most of them. Over time I just figured out what works well and what doesn't. A lot of it is just trial and error.
That's the hall mark of a master craftsman (you know what works). But I must admit if I hadn't spent years as a welder fabricator learning the trade, I wouldn't be able to visualize a piece in my head and just build it. Most people can't comprehend looking at a tree and seeing a end table or bowl. You can. If I hadn't spent years cutting metal stock, laying out patterns for cutting and center punching holes, building jigs I wouldn't be able to walk through a hardware store and just know what I need to build a cabinet a table a dresser an armoire.
 
  • #17
dlgoff
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The tools
No lathe? How did you make the legs?
 
  • #18
ProfuselyQuarky
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No lathe? How did you make the legs?
Pardon, but what's a lathe?
 
  • #19
dlgoff
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  • #20
ProfuselyQuarky
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See Lathe
That's a fine tool right there, that lathe. Reminds me of the thing used to peel apples for pie :smile:

I like pie but homemade pie on a homemade table made with a lathe is much better, I daresay!
 
  • #21
dlgoff
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Nice work; with the tools you used.
 
  • #22
strangerep
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So I purchased 8 premade wooden legs, pine
Oh, that's just plain cheating! :biggrin:

The tools:
I did this all in our sun room which is a small space but just large enough for a couple of saw bucks and my power tools. I used a Jigsaw, a circular saw, a hand drill, a wood router, and an elliptical sander "jitter bug". Hand tools: combination square, carpenters square, calipers, tape measure hammer nail punch putty knife, utility knife, pliers, screwdrivers
What? No SCMS? :-p

BTW, you might enjoy this woodwork forum. Vast amounts of good information and advice.
 
  • #23
johnniewalk
Great work looks pretty good
 
  • #24
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Nice work; with the tools you used.
Actually I used way more than what's pictured, for some reason they all wouldn't up load.
 
  • #25
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No lathe? How did you make the legs?
I purchased them premade and I can't see how they would have been "lathed", the legs are octagonal in shape so they were probably milled. I did have to do a lot of fitting because that set of legs came from the store at 28". The wood is slightly more porous then I expected also, I talked to a friend of mine who is a woodworking teacher and he said they were probably ash. They soaked up stain like end grain.
 

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