Have you noticed this?

  1. honestrosewater

    honestrosewater 2,330
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    Why is everyone suddenly using "affect" instead of "effect"? I know it's language and blah blah it changes. But has anyone noticed this, or is it just me? I rarely ever used to see anyone use "affect", and now I see it all the time- when "effect" makes perfect sense.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. In what instances? Sometimes "affect" is the correct word, and sometimes "effect" is the correct word. Naturally, most of the English speakers in the world have no idea that they are not the same word, so it can be pretty irritating if it's one of your pet peeves.

    --J
     
  4. Yeah Justin is right.
    You're probably just seeing people using it in a sense where it is the correct word to use instead of affect.
    Although I'd probably bank on the fact that it might be someone who just doesn't know the difference between to the two words.
     
  5. honestrosewater

    honestrosewater 2,330
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    Well, I guess using "affect" as a noun when they mean "effect". For instance, google "affect on"- over a million hits. Bah, I never paid much attention to the difference, but now it's on my list. No one taught us this in school. Or I was absent that day. Anyway, I'm not really talking about improper use, just that people are using "affect" more than usual. I'm seeing "effect" less and "affect" more.
     
  6. dextercioby

    dextercioby 12,294
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    You people ought to read books and stop thinking about all sorts of **** during the English classes.

    Else,don't go to school,especially since it's not free,nor compulsory.

    Daniel.
     
  7. Note dex's meticulous attention to grammar during this specific post :tongue2:
     
  8. honestrosewater

    honestrosewater 2,330
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    It does make sense that as I read more advanced writing, in a more formal setting, I would see "affect" more often, since I think a lot of people are more comfortable with "effect" and use it more often. I used "effect" more often myself, not really thinking about which was correct (until this morning).
     
  9. dextercioby

    dextercioby 12,294
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    I always pay attention to grammar.Spelling can be screwed up from time to time,but i may have the excuse of (English) not being my native language.:wink:

    As for effect vs. affect,it's simply LAME.:yuck:

    Daniel.
     
  10. honestrosewater

    honestrosewater 2,330
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    Grammar school is compulsory. :tongue2: And it's something I noticed while I was reading books. And I'm checking to see if others have made the same observation. So :tongue2: Of course, I appreciate your words of wisdom as always. :biggrin:
     
  11. Well, the next time you start examining the effects of your particle accelerator bunny exterminator on cute pink flying bunny rabbits and wish it could effect them more, don't come complaining to me when you drown in your own pool of rabbits.

    --J
     
  12. dextercioby

    dextercioby 12,294
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    *wondering* Should I tell'im ? :rolleyes:

    Affect (v. t.) To act upon; to produce an effect or change upon.

    Daniel.

    P.S.honestlyrosewater,I appreciate your kind words and your irony... :tongue2:
     
  13. Don't worry, dex, it was intentional.

    tr.v. ef·fect·ed, ef·fect·ing, ef·fects

    1. To bring into existence.

    --J
     
  14. Did you get it yet, dexter, or should we tell you?
     
  15. I'm not exactly sure what you're saying.

    I've noticed that people misuse both word here all the time, thinking, I suppose, that they're interchangable, which they aren't. The confusion probably results from the obvious fact that the pronounciation is the same.

    Did you know that "affect" is also a noun, with the accent on the first syllable?
     
  16. arildno

    arildno 12,015
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    "Conan the Barbarian effected his entrance into the Temple of Doom by lopping off the high priest's head. This action affected the high priest's health in a grievous manner"
     
  17. honestrosewater

    honestrosewater 2,330
    Gold Member

    Yes, but that was the only part of the definition I remembered reading, and I knew what "effect" meant, so I would just use "effect". It never bothered me and doesn't really bother me now. I had just noticed "affect" being used more than I had seen it used a couple years ago. This is probably just because I am reading more formal works where the mistake is less likely. So it was probably just because of a change in my reading habits, not a change in other people's writing habits.

    Anyway, don't keep me hanging. What happens to the bunnies?

    Oh, I didn't know the pronunciation. I never really use "affect" as a noun.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2005
  18. Some probably don't know that they are making the mistake (due to English as alternate [not necessarily 2nd] language)
    Others because they just don't know the difference (English first language)

    And probably more, out of laziness for not spellchecking their post because the figure the affect that their misuse of the words will not effect the posting community.
     
  19. I am still not sure what you're pointing at. Could you go and get all the definitions of affect and effect in all their parts of speech and post them here for us, then point out the ones you see being mistaken for each other?
     
  20. arildno

    arildno 12,015
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    From this example, it should be quite clear that the verbs have distinct usages:
     
  21. Whoopsey! You need to check what "affect" means when used as a noun.

    Edit: And what "effect" means when used as a verb.
     
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