Having a little trouble understanding electromagnetic induction

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of electromagnetic induction and how it relates to voltage production. The question is whether magnets in series or in parallel would produce more voltage in a setup with coils and wires. The answer is that coils in series would have a higher result because the individual voltages can be added together. However, coils have little influence in holding a charge. The conversation also mentions that coils do not generate a charge, but rather the movement of charges along the wires caused by the magnet produces voltage and current. The conversation ends with the mention of a separate question related to quantum physics.
  • #1
Valce
11
0
Having a little trouble understanding electromagnetic induction...
Do you produce more voltage when magnets are 'in series' or 'parallel?' I realize those might not be orthodox terms, so I'll try describe what I mean in words:


Say I have a few small permanent magnets to generate a current with. I set up something with coils of wires and pass magnets through etc. I set up 2 somewhat different 'generators'

In one of them, I somehow stick the small magnets together to form one big magnet with a single collective North and South pole (I.E. the South poles of all the magnets are in the same place and the North's are in the same place)

In the other, I have several interconnected coils of wires, and I alternate running magnets up and down the coils simultaneously. (So I drop a magnet down the first coil, run one up the second, drop one down the third, etc.)

Which one would produce more volts? And does that mean that the other one would maintain a charge longer?


There's another part to my question but that fits more into Quantum Physics...
Thank you!
 
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  • #2
Coils in series will have a higher result because we can add all the individual voltages.
If our energy input is the same in both cases we should see a higer current in case of the parallel coils when we comple the circuits.

Coils have very little influence in holding a charge. In terms of your question coils are not generating a charge but the magnet will (sort of) move the charges allong the wires in the coils and therefore producing voltages and currents. (Sorry in case I misunderstood your last question). Thanks for not asking the QM question.

Eric
 
  • #3
Thank you!

:smile:
 

What is electromagnetic induction?

Electromagnetic induction is the process by which a changing magnetic field produces an electric current in a conductor. This phenomenon was discovered by Michael Faraday in the 19th century and is the basis for many technologies, including generators and transformers.

How does electromagnetic induction work?

Electromagnetic induction works by creating a magnetic field that varies in strength or direction near a conductor. This changing magnetic field induces a current in the conductor, according to Faraday's law of induction. The strength of the induced current depends on the strength of the magnetic field and the rate of change of the field.

What are some examples of electromagnetic induction in everyday life?

One common example of electromagnetic induction is the use of generators to produce electricity. When a wire is moved through a magnetic field, it experiences a force that can be used to turn a turbine and generate electricity. Other examples include transformers, which use induction to change the voltage of an electrical current, and induction cooktops, which use magnetic fields to heat metal pans.

What factors affect the strength of the induced current in electromagnetic induction?

The strength of the induced current depends on the strength of the magnetic field, the rate of change of the field, and the properties of the conductor. Factors such as the distance between the conductor and the magnetic field, the material of the conductor, and the frequency of the changing magnetic field can also affect the strength of the induced current.

How is electromagnetic induction related to other principles in physics?

Electromagnetic induction is closely related to other principles in physics, such as electricity, magnetism, and motion. It is a fundamental principle in electromagnetism and plays a crucial role in many technologies, including motors, generators, and transformers. It also has applications in fields such as telecommunications, electronics, and power generation.

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