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B Hawking radiation

  1. Apr 27, 2017 #1
    Recently I was actually stuck on a thought about hawing radiation.
    If quantum fluctuations cause virtual particles to occur from space. So, to maintain the balance of mass in the universe, the particle with -ve energy should be having -ve mass, right?
    If so, by Newton's equation of gravitation, it should be having anti-gravity properties when near a body with positive body.
    For the body to fall into the black hole, at a certain point, the velocity of the -ve mass body should be greater than the velocity of light. So black evaporation would not be happening.
    So does the body with -ve energy has -ve mass also?
    If so, how will it fall into the black hole?

    I am just in 10th grade, and I am asking this out of a bot of curiosity. I do sincerely apologize if it is wrong for wasting your precious time.:smile:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 27, 2017 #2

    Orodruin

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    Not right. Also beware that the "virtual particle falling into the black hole" picture of Hawking radiation is a very heuristic one. As Hawking himself put it, it is the closest description in terms of English that he could think of. It is not a picture that should be used to draw any kind of inferences about what is going on.
     
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