Heat death inevitable?

  • Thread starter Delong
  • Start date
  • #26
Why does that suck? If the dark energy is truly a cosmological constant, then the universe will approach a small but non-zero temperature in the far future. This non-zero temperature means that there will be quantum fluctuations that will produce new regions of space-time periodically within our own. A heat death universe is not the end except in the sense that it is the end of our universe. A recollapse scenario would just bring about the end of our universe more rapidly.

Chalnoth, can you provide any supporting material for your speculative ideas?
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #27
bcrowell
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Insights Author
Gold Member
6,723
424
You are right the article does not mention the term "Heat Radiation Gravitation" The article mentions "Superinflation", which in my opinion gives a better interpretion of the term "Superinflation."

The article has nothing to do with the speculative material in your #14. Please calm down.
 
  • #28
The article has nothing to do with the speculative material in your #14.

Since you are making it sound like you understand the "SuperInflation" concept as described in the article. Then explain what you think the article means by "SuperInflation" in regards to the "Big Bounce" theory; which would act in contradiction to a "Heat Death" model of the universe; which is based on the original post (OP)'s question??

Answering this question is what is called, engaging in physics!!
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #29
Chalnoth
Science Advisor
6,195
447
This appears highly speculative.
Only in the sense of proposing that the dark energy truly is a cosmological constant. But then that's not so much speculative as it is the simplest explanation that fits the data. Anyway, here's a paper that went into this in a fair amount of detail:
http://arxiv.org/abs/hep-th/0410270
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #30
Only in the sense of proposing that the dark energy truly is a cosmological constant. But then that's not so much speculative as it is the simplest explanation that fits the data. Anyway, here's a paper that went into this in a fair amount of detail:
http://arxiv.org/abs/hep-th/0410270


Chalnoth, you mention that the dark energy truly is a cosmological constant. The speed of light in a vacuum is a cosmological constant. Are you supposing that the dark energy is truly is a cosmological constant, like the speed of light in a vacuum?

Are you stating that the Dark Energy has the same value throughout the universe? If this is true where is this found in litererature??

And what is the math that describes this dark energy cosmological constant?
 
  • #31
Chalnoth
Science Advisor
6,195
447
Chalnoth, you mention that the dark energy truly is a cosmological constant. The speed of light in a vacuum is a cosmological constant.
This is equivocation. The cosmological constant is a very specific parameter in General Relativity. The speed of light is a different constant with very different implications.

Are you stating that the Dark Energy has the same value throughout the universe? If this is true where is this found in litererature??

And what is the math that describes this dark energy cosmological constant?
I'm not so sure going into a discussion of the mathematics involved here would be that good for this thread. But suffice it to say that the fact that the cosmological constant is a constant is precisely what makes it cause the acceleration of the expansion of the universe.
 
  • #32
367
3
Since you are making it sound like you understand the "SuperInflation" concept as described in the article. Then explain what you think the article means by "SuperInflation" in regards to the "Big Bounce" theory; which would act in contradiction to a "Heat Death" model of the universe; which is based on the original post (OP)'s question??

Answering this question is what is called, engaging in physics!!

With regards to the OP "what can we do about it":

I think the unltimate fate of the U, whether Big Rip, Oscilatory or a heat death, is completely beyond our realm of influence. It is like asking what an Ant can do to stop the Earth moving round the Sun - a crude analogy but meant to emphasize the totally limited influence we have on an entire Universes evolutionary path.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #33
Chalnoth
Science Advisor
6,195
447
With regards to the OP "what can we do about it":

I think the unltimate fate of the U, whether Big Rip, Oscilatory or a heat death, is completely beyond our realm of influence. It is like asking what an Ant can do to stop the Earth moving round the Sun - a crude analogy but meant to emphasize the totally limited influence we have on an entire Universes evolutionary path.
I would also like to add that this analogy is expected to hold no matter what level of technology our species eventually reaches.
 
  • #34
George Jones
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
7,438
1,094
In order to remove "personal heat", this thread has been edited. This thread should stay on topic, so any concerns about the editing should be sent to me (or any other Mentor) by PM.
 
  • #35
367
3
I would also like to add that this analogy is expected to hold no matter what level of technology our species eventually reaches.

Thanks Chalnoth - I should have emphasized that I would expect the analogy to hold no matter what level of technology we could potentially attain.
 
  • #36
234
2
Yes, but not whatever technology the ants obtain! They are by far more persistent little buggers than we are.
 

Related Threads on Heat death inevitable?

  • Last Post
Replies
8
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
6
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
8
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
16
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
9
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
18
Views
3K
Replies
32
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
15
Views
1K
Top