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Heating my childs bedroom

  1. Sep 22, 2010 #1
    lil question for anyone who may have any suggestions, im livin in a house at the moment with my partner and 13 month old daughter, the house is single glazed and is poorly insulated, now winters just around the corner and if last year is anything to go by, then were in for a cold one again, now my baby's bedroom last year got down to 6 degrees at night last year on some days,

    i was wondering if anyone had any suggestions as to heating the room through the night without having my central heating on throughout, i was looking at little halogen heaters on ebay but someone i work with mensioned they would work out even more expensive than having my central heating churning away, anyone have any ideas? "and ripping the windows out an puttin double glazin aint an option :smile:"

    thanks for any suggestions, there much appreciated before i lay out a fortune for little toys that dont work
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 22, 2010 #2
    If it gets that cold in the room it should be possible to find out where the cold is coming in. Are there cracks around the windows? Are there any other cracks to the outside. Even electrical wall outlets are a possibility. After fixing all of those, you might try getting plastic sheets to put over the windows. It's not as good as a double glaze but it's better than just the window by itself. In addition, if you tape it to the frame of the window, it may help stop air leaks around the window.
     
  4. Sep 22, 2010 #3

    phyzguy

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    For a few dollars you can buy plastic inside storm windows that go over the inside of the windows, then you stretch them tight with a hair dryer. These will help a lot. Once you've done this, I think a small electric space heater just heating one room will be cheaper than heating the whole house with central heating.
     
  5. Sep 22, 2010 #4

    Danger

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    In furtherance of Phyzguy's post, I would recommend an electric/oil heater as opposed to a purely electric one. The heat is a little less "harsh", and the fire hazard is eliminated.
     
  6. Sep 22, 2010 #5

    Pythagorean

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    IMO halogens are a terrible fire danger.
     
  7. Sep 22, 2010 #6

    Monique

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    Why would you let your house cool down to 6oC? I think it is better to keep the central heating on to 16oC during the night, than to let it cool down and having to reheat it in the morning.

    In addition to the other suggestions some heavy curtains that drop down to the floor might also help keep the heat in and the cold out.
     
  8. Sep 22, 2010 #7
    true, this is a bit of a concern for me, beings as this will be turned on overnight in my child's bedroom, so i will be looking for more along the oil heating just not too sure what the costing is going to be for that over a fairly long period :-/

    As for "skeptic2 and phyzguy"'s comments regarding the plastic, i've never come across that before until u mentioned it, i've just looked online an it seems quite cheap, i don't know if that is a reprisentation of the quality but i've ordered some, it cant hurt for that price, and any extra insulation is better than none so ill let ya know what that goes.

    so are my only options for actually heating the room "halogen/electric heater OR oil filled radiator"?! there must be another option i haven't considered or come across yet, thanks for everyones input into this its much appreciated
     
  9. Sep 22, 2010 #8
    its not a question of choice unfortunately at the moment our gas/electricity bills are £219 per month with E.on and thats with the minimum of electrical appliances, it was all caused by the horrible winter last year, and having the heating on for as much as we could afford and now were playing catch up with the balance. hence im looking for a few little cheats or tips, so i can keep the baby warm during the next winter and save us a few pennies in the process.
     
  10. Sep 22, 2010 #9

    Evo

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    If you have central heat, make sure the vent in her room is open, test to see if the air blows as strongly as in other rooms. I had one room that had a kink in the conduit and was blocking most of the air flow to one room. At night, close the vents in rooms that aren't being used.

    Do check as others have said for insulation problems, you'd be suprised how much cold air will come in through electrial outlets, cap them with those baby-proof caps, if you haven't already.

    I would go with the heavy, insulated drapes that Monique suggested.

    This is the baby's room, I would not use any heater except those that blow warm air and do not get hot enough on the outside to cause burns, and that also shut off is something is placed too close to them or if they fall over.
     
  11. Sep 22, 2010 #10

    lisab

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    If your house is so drafty it got to 6C last year, you should ensure her bed is warm. Make sure there are good blankets on top and below (btw, this option isn't a good one for smaller infants, but at 13 months there is virtually no danger of sudden infant death, which http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/content/25/2/366.full.pdf" [Broken]).
     
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  12. Sep 22, 2010 #11

    Monique

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    But what I have heard is that it costs more energy to heat up a house that has cooled down a lot, than it does when you maintain a minimum temperature of about 16oC during the night.
     
  13. Sep 22, 2010 #12
    true,

    Also heating by electricity is just about the worst return for the invested energy as most of it is wasted in the heat of the engines in the power plant. Direct burning of fuels inside the house is much better, since almost all the heat return is used from the fuel, but there are hazards with that.

    Also it might be worth considering to tackle the thermal isolation problem. You could tape or nail isolation foils on the ceiling and walls for the duration of the winter, for instance aluminium bubble foil, which should not be that expensive. It may not look pretty but that was not the prime objective
     
  14. Sep 22, 2010 #13
    This is what we will do with our daughter's room (little E is now 14 months). Her "playroom" is off the back of the house, and probably used to be a "mudroom" for the master bedroom (the owners of the house used it to store wood, then recarpeted and painted it when we moved in). There is no central heat/air in that room, we presently leave the door to our room open. In the winter we aren't planning on heating it, and may close it up for parts of the day if heat loss is high, even with the plastic window and door insulation measures (since we never use the door to the outside and have it deadbolted, we'll be sealing it with heat-sealer tape also).

    We won't put any space heater in it though, and will instead just see how cold it gets... maybe shutting it up for cold spells (the weather down here in TN sometimes has harsh snaps, but is fortunately pretty mild). I'd personally be cautious about ANY type of space heater, especially with a toddler in the house.

    You might want to think about moving your daughter to a different location, though that view is different for different families. In our case, little E "co-sleeps" in our room -- snuggling with me half the night and rolling into a twin bed pushed up to ours for the other half (since we didn't want to spring for a crib -- and moved one of her older brothers, who is handicapped into a queen, since his twin was getting too small and he was rolling off). Staying in our room, she certainly stays pretty warm, crawling up the king mattress to me for warm-up spells (since here in the summer, her dad keeps the AC blowing), although my sleep routine certainly suffers. :smile: She hates blankets, but tolerates long jammies with feet, although they aren't her favorite.

    I think her dad is less keen on the co-sleeping than I, but she's on my side of the bed, and he definitely thinks it has helped make her secure, happy, and confident. He does think it's cute when she wakes up in the morning and drags her favorite stuffed toy "Mr. Shark" up to him, and he likes goodnight, when they play peek-a-boo (though I think this makes it harder to get her to sleep).
     
  15. Sep 22, 2010 #14
    If it's your house and has potential, then I'd bust-out the interior walls, install insulation, then re-do the walls. It's not difficult to install/add insulation in the attic. If it's a raised house, then put insulation between floor joices as well. If you live in northern latitudes and the house has potential, I'd install double-glazed windows. Make sure the central air is flowing right. Sometimes there are butterfly valves in the duct work in the attic that control this. If you have them, make sure they are adjusted right. I would not use any other heater unless I was desperate.
     
  16. Sep 22, 2010 #15
    thanks for all the replies guys im gonna give the window film a go for sure, and were looking into insulated drapes, an just seeing how much the temperature drops in the room, after weighing up the pro's and cons of using a heater weve decided to just go for insulating and filling in anything that may cause a draft, thanks for the comments about the electrical outlets, i just popped in to take a look and there definitely is a draft coming from the empty sockets.

    the mrs is also a big believer in co sleeping and has made it clear if it does get a bit to harsh in the lil ones room, then she'll be moving the baby into the bed with her an shovin me into the cold and hostile babys room for the duration "oh joy"
     
  17. Sep 22, 2010 #16
    all valid suggestions unfortunately its privately rented so we havent got that option, although we did put down a fresh layer of insulation in the attic back in april, which was more out of necessity as when, we ventured up there for the first time, we discovered ... there was none. We did discuss with the landlord about replacing the windows with double glazed units, as conveniently i work for an alluminium window firm and mensioned that i could do all the work my self, but he turned down the offer stating that now isnt the best time to be spending money on none essentials "us freezing to death wouldnt be high up on his list of priorities by the looks of it".
     
  18. Sep 22, 2010 #17

    lisab

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    Lol...!
     
  19. Sep 22, 2010 #18

    Monique

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    All the more reason to get this problem fixed :biggrin:
     
  20. Sep 23, 2010 #19

    BobG

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    If you have the duct vents, figure out which other vents use the same duct. Close them (or at least some of them) at night so more heat goes to the child's room.

    Insulation is probably a problem as well. When it does get cold, feel the floor and walls to figure out where the problem is. A throw rug can give you extra insulation for the floor, although usually the leak is in an awkard spot, like right up against a wall, so placing an extra rug on the floor won't add to the aesthetic properties of the room.
     
  21. Sep 24, 2010 #20

    Pythagorean

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    why not co sleep with the baby as well?
     
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